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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Stop Whatever You're Doing…

…and read this. It is Mets By The Numbers' q&a (third part of a three-part series) with longtime beat writer Marty Noble, formerly of Newsday, now with mlb.com. It may be the best and most eclectic history of the New York Mets ever recorded.

Kudos to mbtn and its founder, Jon Springer, on beginning a tenth year of tracking Met numerology with such understanding, insight and wry humor. He and fellow obsessive Matt Silverman (who's got a fun new blog of his own, Metsilverman, worth checking out) have released a book based on Mets By The Numbers and it will be reviewed here early next week. Until then, ya gotta read the Noble piece. You'll never think of half the Mets you think you know the same way again.

11 comments to Stop Whatever You're Doing…

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for the pub. I think this is actually something that should get noticed.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for the link, Greg. That was a great piece I wouldn't have otherwise come across.
    I'm not Noble's biggest fan, but his institutional memory is rivaled by few “inside” this organization at this point, which makes him an amazing resource.
    Thanks, too, to the MBTN crew for a great read. I'll be visiting more.

  • Anonymous

    Hi Greg,
    Actually, Ed Kranepool was the first to wear number 21 when he came up to the Mets at the end of the 1962 season, not Warren Spahn in 1965 as Marty Noble recalls. Good to know I'm not alone with a memory that is breaking down more and more as the years go by.
    Kranepool is Caucasian, isn't he?

  • Anonymous

    Reeder shout-out, woo-hoo! And 23 will always be Doug Flynn to me.
    I have a million of them (just ask Greg), but probably my most irrational number association is 33. Every time I see it, I think Andy Tomberlin.
    I know.

  • Anonymous

    When I think of number 33 it's always Ron Hunt, the first Met starting All-Star

  • Anonymous

    Barry Lyons. I could be staring at John Maine and it would be Barry Lyons.

  • Anonymous

    Ha!! And I could be staring at Todd Pratt, with “PRATT 7″ on his back, and I'd still see 43… even though I always see Paul Byrd whenever I see 43.
    I know… you don't have time to unravel my logic.

  • Anonymous

    Seven-Seven-Seven they will call you…

  • Anonymous

    up to heaven, heaven, heaven you will soar…

  • Anonymous

    I adore you both.

  • Anonymous

    Great interview indeed. Also, Mets by the Numbers the book is even better than Mets by the Numbers the website. But don't take my word for it, buy the book and read it yourselves!