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Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

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Shea Experiential Advice Requested

Our friends at Loge 13 are fielding an interesting request from Andrew of Canada, a reader who's visiting Shea for the first time next week month: “How can I get the best Shea Stadium experience?”

Kingman of Loge 13 offered some great tips, including a hike to Upper Deck, Section 48, Row V to admire the view; homage to the Agee marker if he makes it down alive; and an Italian sausage as a reward. I might add try to explain to an usher on Field Level that you only want to go down to buy the Daruma of Great Neck sushi, not to change your seats…and see if you can finish the conversation civilly or without the exchange of presidential flashcards.

Any ideas on what else to tell Andrew? Like Eminem in 8 Mile, he's only got one shot at Shea. What would you do tell him to do with it so as to properly lose himself in the experience?

18 comments to Shea Experiential Advice Requested

  • Anonymous

    Spend one inning behind home, one inning behind first, one inning behind third. Any section.
    Watch the apple go up; hopefully you won't have to wait for the 7th-inning stretch to see it.
    If you're coming with a kid, take him to the right field corner of field level, near the food court, and let him a) touch the foul pole; b) let him try to catch the attention of the bullpen folks (they might actually respond, since it would be a change of pace for them to hear nice things; this worked when my younger brother got a hat-tip and wave from Anthony Young back in the day).
    Cheer those who are wearing orange and blue. If this is your only Shea trip, you want to remember that you cheered.
    Most of all, savor the moment you turn from the concourse towards your section, take in that moment of anticipation between the time you're staring at food service stations and Baseball, and smile. Then go enjoy the game.

  • Anonymous

    Photo op with Cowbell Man?

  • Anonymous

    Give Mr. Met a high five!

  • Anonymous

    spend an inning in mezz18 on a sunday

  • Anonymous

    Make sure to get a good spot at Gate D before halftime.
    Wait, what?

  • Anonymous

    I concur :)

  • Anonymous

    go to the suites/diamond club level and see the “Hall of Fame” and the championship trophies.

  • Anonymous

    though he'll probably find YOU, cow-bell man has seats on loge level, the extreme right field, section 33. while it's higher than field level, if you're there at the end of the game and you're looking into the bullpen, a mets pitcher could very well toss you a ball. one has done it each time i've been there on my sunday package.
    if you're at the field-level right field area, that's where the mets kids club sets up before the game, with its array of overstocked promotions (refrigerator magnets, anyone?) that it gives to kids who are members. even if you don't have a card, if you tell the story of being from out of town, one and only trip to shea, etc., the folks in charge — they're teens, mostly — will probably let the young'un choose some free souvenir.
    other good spots — i'd make the sweep around to the left field in-play seats too. the upper deck, fo' sho — if anyone's got a fear of heights make it quick, but if that's not a concern, go up to the very top row and look out the back.
    i have taken one shea-virginal friend to shea this season, and we agree: it's a charmless old heap. that doesn't mean it hasn't had its moments.

  • Anonymous

    Seriously, is there any way a regular joe schmo can get a shot at this?

  • Anonymous

    Anyone is allowed into the “Mets Hall of Fame”, which is just a lobby between the two Diamond Club-level restaurants, with the busts of the honored and the WS trophies in a big glass case. (Gosh, I hope they upgrade this at Citifield.)
    They only ask for your Diamond Club pass if you try to actually get in to one of the eateries. Unless you're a fan of overpriced buffets or grimy windowless barrooms, they're worthy of a pass. Get a Mama's Italian hero instead.

  • Anonymous

    Have a conversation with one of the ushers. It will be an unforgettable experience.

  • Anonymous

    He should go to the bullpen and offer to pitch in relief, maybe even close

  • Anonymous

    Andrew from Canada here. Thanks, Greg, for soliciting tips on my behalf. And thanks guys, these are great suggestions. I'm actually not headed to NY until Sept. (12, vs. Braves), so I've got lotsa time to compile an itinerary. My traveling companion's got a fear of heights, but that doesn't mean I'm not gonna subject him to the touted view.
    Anyway, wish I could return the favo(u)r by offering tips to maximize the Olympic Stadium experience in Montreal, but, well, you know…

  • Anonymous

    If you like beer (you're from Canada, I'm stereotyping), drive out early. Like 4:00. Get yourself a good parking spot – I'm partial to the Roosevelt Ave lot – and set up your beach chairs. (Important: Bring travel mugs or Dunkin Donuts coffee cups because overzealous cops will ticket you for public imbibing if you swill out of the can/bottle.) And then soak up the atmosphere. Toss around a ball. Talk to your fellow fans. We're friendly and when you tell them how far you've traveled, they'll feed you.
    I seem to be in the minority on this forum, but I find tailgating an integral part of the ballpark experience. I prefer hanging out in the parking lot until 6:45 to wandering around Shea looking for something to do, or reading the inanities on DiamondVision.

  • Anonymous

    Generally speaking, that stereotype is true.

  • Anonymous

    Anyone care to share their tricks on getting into the Diamond Club?
    Getting into the Grill Room is easy. There is a unmarked and unguarded back entryway. Go to the Mezzanine and descend the Gate C ramp one level. Once on Press/Club level you will see a door which is always open. Walk past a kitchen entry and then make a right before the men's room. You will now be in the Grill Room. You can scoot up to the bar or seat yourself in the resturant. Be advised if restuarant is crowded or the staff is in a bad mood you may not be served.

  • Anonymous

    It's fun take pictures of the General Manager's office. Go to the field level behind Home Plate. Walk towards first base . On the right past some food stands is a mirrored window. If you look thru or over the mirrored part of the last window, you will looking directly behind Omar Minaya's desk.

  • Anonymous

    I don't know about Andrew, but I'm getting some pretty good tips for myself. Too bad they expire 9/28/08.