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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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More Than a Token Appearance

Once upon a time there was a runner named Rosie Ruiz who completed the 1979 New York City Marathon with the assistance of a subway ride, which will make the 26 miles and 385 yards just fly by. Nobody found that out, however, until after she was the first woman to cross the finish line at the 1980 Boston Marathon…a race she mastered by joining it while it was in progress. You wanted to know from shortcuts, Rosie was your gal.

Half marathon, full effort.

On the other hand, Faith and Fear reader Sharon Chapman went the distance this past Sunday in the New York City Half Marathon, 13.1 miles through Manhattan, concluding near Battery Park, which is where she showed off her uniquely NYC medal and FAFIF wristband.

Sharon, as you can read here, is working her way toward the 2010 New York City Marathon while raising funds for the Tug McGraw Foundation’s ongoing battle against brain cancer every step of the way. We want to take this opportunity to both congratulate Sharon on running a heckuva race and thank all who came out to Two Boots Tavern for AMAZIN’ TUESDAY and contributed to this most worthy cause. Everybody’s efforts on the Foundation’s behalf add a whole new layer of meaning to You Gotta Believe.

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Tug McGraw, converting Mets fans into Believers, 1973.

You can learn more about the Foundation’s research and awareness efforts here and, if so moved and able, donate here.

Photograph of Sharon Chapman by the incomparable David G. Whitham.

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