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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The Best Available Athletes

In case you haven’t turned on ESPN in the last week, the NFL Draft is in progress. It began Thursday night and it runs through late June. Makes for captivating theater, as in you’d have to hold me captive to get me to sit inside Radio City Music Hall for all 481 rounds of it.

Correction: […]

Isaac Bashevis Swinger?

Violinist Issac Stern played great music. Writer Isaac Bashevis Singer wrote great fiction. First baseman Issac Benjamin Davis made a helluva catch on a foul popup in the first inning of Wednesday’s otherwise desultory Met loss.

All these Isaacs were blessed with a talent for doing something most people can’t. Stern was awarded the Presidential Medal […]

Reyes Über Alles

[T]he only name anyone sings in the Yorkshire ale houses, raising their stinking jars to their stinking mouths, is Brian Clough. Brian Clough über-fucking-alles! Understand?
—Brian Clough, The Damned United

I don’t know when it will be 2006 again for the Mets. I don’t know when we’ll have a regular season in which we praise our lads […]

The Glass Is Half Something

Watching Mike Pelfrey obliterate the Cubs and the Mets hitters do enough, I felt something I hadn’t felt since Opening Day. Or rather, I noted the absence of something.

Panic.

In 2009, a late two-run lead for the Mets was called foreshadowing. In the first week of the season it was a fantasy, as the Mets weren’t […]

Ike Gets Called Up

It’s great to be young and a Met, Ike Davis could tell you after his most successful major league debut Monday night. The 23-year-old first baseman was the toast of Citi Field from the moment he showed up wearing No. 42. If ever anybody stood out in a mononumeric crowd, it was this kid who […]

Davis! Save Us!

Ike Davis: I am NOT the Messiah!
Mets Fans: We say you are, Ike, and we should know — we’ve followed a few.

Apologies to Life of Brian, but that what’s it’s been like over the last 24 hours: Ike Davis was hastily recalled from some hazy, happier future to the troubled present, and after thinking about […]

The Age of Diminished Expectations

Pirates manager Jim Leyland took issue with the team’s We Play Hardball promo. “We can’t say we play hardball, I’m tired of that bleep,” he said.
—Peter Gammons, Sports Illustrated, June 9, 1986

Adam Wainwright gave the Cardinals everything they could have asked for Sunday night: a 107-pitch complete game victory. John Maine gave the Mets everything […]

The Game to End All Games & 45 for 45

Winning in 20 innings by using 24 Mets who accumulated 9 hits despite batting against 2 Cardinal position players for the last 3 of those innings has generated some truly deep thinking among our readers, as evidenced by our unusually busy (for a Sunday) comments section and in-box. It’s great stuff, particularly the following, an […]

Stupid Wins As Stupid Does

Tim McCarver called it a classic. The Baseball Tonight crawl called it a classic. Yet don’t mistake long for excellent. That was not a classic. It was certifiably long, the final result was immensely preferable to the alternative, and there were certainly aspects of it to like and even treasure, but that 20-inning Mets win […]

Albert's Supporting Cast

I suppose what I’ll remember from this game is the look of anguish on Raul Valdes’s face as he watched his curveball not curve.

Or, rather, it did curve — very gently, so as to offer itself politely to Felipe Lopez’s bat and thereby begin its long trip to a final destination beyond the left-field fence. […]