The blog for Mets fans
who like to read


Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The Murph Game

Daniel Murphy made an error. You probably noticed.

Murph’s error came in a house-of-horrors eighth inning at Citi Field, a frame that’s an excellent candidate to take up residence in the recesses of your brain, to be hauled out and fumed over at future 3 AMs.

But Murph wasn’t the only thing going bump in the night on what became a Halloween […]

Those Guys!

I love the way the Kansas City Royals play baseball. They’re impossible to strike out, they pressure defenses on the basepaths, and they play a wild-eyed, high-stepping game. Which is pretty much the way they look on infield defense too, smothering balls and getting filthy and recording outs.

It’s exciting, fun stuff.

The only problem with that — […]

Making a Good Plan Better

The Mets have used a simple formula to get past the Dodgers and 3/4 of the way past the Cubs:

Combine great starting pitching with a shutdown ninth inning.
Wait for Daniel Murphy to do something awesome.

It’s worked pretty well … but the Mets are adding ingredients to the recipe.

We’ll get back to the latest legends of Murphtober and […]

Pinch Me ... No Wait, Don't

The physicist Leonard Mlodinow has something to say about baseball narratives. This is from The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives (via this Freaknonomics post):

…if one team is good enough to warrant beating another in 55% of its games, the weaker team will nevertheless win a seven-game series about four times out of 10. And […]

Sometimes It's Simple

Baseball is a game played nine to a side, with wheeling motion and shifting fielding assignments and set plays and so much else. But each play starts not with nine people doing multiple things, but with one person doing one thing: The pitcher takes the ball and throws it in the direction of home plate.

When […]

Full of Cake, Want Icing

A while back I declared that we’d already won, and anything else that came our way would be lagniappe — games stolen from wintertime. That wasn’t an attempted reverse jinx (though I’m far from above such things) — I meant it. The postseason’s a crapshoot but gets all the attention; the regular season’s the prize, but the […]

Lightning Strikes Twice

Back in June, Emily and I decided that a lovely summer night would be made even better by our attending a ballgame. So we did … and watched the Mets get no-hit by Chris Heston and the San Francisco Giants.

I grumbled and groaned for competitive and aesthetic reasons. The competitive reasons for not wanting my […]

Living Through Silly Season

Several times this winter, I’ll sigh and tell my wife how I’d do anything to watch any baseball game — even say, a June snoozer pitting the Brewers against the D-Backs. I’ll mean it, of course — nothing comforts me while staring out the window and waiting for spring. Not winter ball, not Mets Classics, not hot-stove […]

My Missouri Adventure

I’ll admit this: I never thought Fred Wilpon’s line about meaningful games in September was so embarrassing. Granted, I would have revised the line to “meaningful games in the last week of September.” If you’re playing those, your team’s kept you scoreboard watching, hoping and dreaming almost until the end, which I’ll always sign up for. […]

Welcome Home


It’s not a new story any more. In fact it’s a well-worn tale on its way to becoming a cliche.

But that’s the fate of stories that resonate with people, that mean something. And this one does. It’s the one I keep coming back to. And it’s worth hearing again.

It’s the story of Wilmer Flores, sent […]