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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The Model of a Modern Pitcher

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

In the 2012 offseason, the Mets made a controversial deal, sending knuckleball artist and fan favorite R.A. Dickey to the Blue Jays for a return built around a minor-leaguer who was seen as a […]

A Mobile Moment

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

The biggest moment in Mets history is also one of the quietest. You’ve seen it: With two outs in the ninth of Game 5 of the 1969 World Series, Davey Johnson hits a fly […]

The M Met

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

In the summer of 2015, an undermanned and shoddily constructed Mets club stumbled along, refusing to fall entirely out of contention despite scoring the fewest runs in the National League, battling injuries, and having […]

Nails and the Chalkboard

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

When I was a teenager, a lot of people assumed I’d be a sportswriter. Which made a lot of sense: I loved baseball and writing, so why not put the two together? But I […]

My Superhero

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

I kicked off my half of our Met for All Seasons posts with a remembrance of Rusty Staub, my first favorite player — and how he turned out to be an ideal choice. That’s […]

Mad Libs and Exits

The beginning of a baseball season is light and consequence-free — with six months of games ahead, you can relax a bit, allowing yourself to simply enjoy having baseball as a companion again. Starting in June, things begin to get serious — you’re conscious of the standings, of opportunities taken and missed and lost. This […]

A Welcome Rediscovery

So Seth Lugo faced the Phillies last week and let’s just say it didn’t go well.

Lugo got strafed. He started out the game fanning Andrew McCutchen, but then gave up back-to-back-to-back homers, also yielding a triple and a run-scoring single in the inning while fanning two more. Can you strike out the side and have […]

Good Night, Sweet Mets

Most of Sunday afternoon’s game was must-see TV: a taut duel between starting pitchers you didn’t think had it in them. Rick Porcello had his best start as a Met, looking like the pitcher he was before his baffling, seemingly self-inflicted transformation into a pinata. The Braves’ Kyle Wright was fabulous too, throwing strikes and […]

Objects in Rearview Mirror Are Farther Than They Appear

The Mets followed two unlikely good nights in which they got lousy, abbreviated starts but hit and relieved their way out of the mess with a thoroughly bad one: no hitting, no relief, and no help on the scoreboard. None of which is ever good, all of which is really bad when the season’s down […]

The Grinding Down

The Mets played one of their more discouraging games of 2020 on Tuesday night, one that left me so dispirited and annoyed that I decided this morning everyone would be better off reliving the misadventures of Paul Sewald, Jonah, than revisiting what had happened more recently.

Fighting for their lives against the Phillies, the Mets … […]