The blog for Mets fans
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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The One That Never Came in View

One of the great frustrations of being a fan is how different a team can look on successive days. In one game absolutely nothing works; less than 24 hours later everything does. Or vice versa, of course. Players know this far better than we do and respond to it with a studied stoicism that we sometimes […]

The Breaks

You probably didn’t need this reminder, but here it is anyway: baseball will make you look dumb.

Like maybe in the afterglow of Thursday night’s thrilling comeback against the Nats (deliciously complete with hirsute heel Jayson Werth shooting his own team in the collective foot) you found yourself thinking that it was really too bad the Mets […]

Fish-Fry Matinee

Was Wednesday afternoon’s matinee a perfect baseball game?

Probably not — if you have to ask you have your own answer — but it was sure an enjoyable one, with a spectacular performance from Jacob deGrom, signs of professional life from Jose Reyes, a terrific day from Wilmer Flores, and a heckuva dragon to slay in a […]

Bystanders

It happens sometimes: life, that amorphous bundle of stuff, refuses to conform itself to the rhythms of 7:10 and 1:10 and 4:10. I thought I had my July 4th parceled out so three hours were reserved for the Mets game, but I hadn’t been paying attention to which day was which.

I’ve got a mental list of […]

Forest and the Trees

When the 2016 Mets trudged home to Citi Field earlier this week, it sure looked like they’d ceded the divisional race on June 29, dragged down by injuries, bad luck, lack of clutchness and Daniel Murphy, to name but a few maladies.

Later today, somehow, they’ll trust a four-game sweep of the big bad Chicago Cubs […]

Other People's Problems

Yep, this was all too typical of recent Mets games: in the seventh, the second baseman had a runner dead to rights at third, and hit the third baseman’s glove, only to see the ball bound away and skitter up the third-base line to bring the enemy go-ahead run home.

It wasn’t over — they fought back […]

Shackleton's Team

Lots of things can go wrong for a baseball team.

Tuesday night — which bled painfully into Wednesday morning — brought cruddy relief, an absence of hitting and some bad luck, all familiar maladies of late. Matt Harvey looked better than he has in a while, with life on his fastball and sharp breaking stuff, but […]

Stop Doing That

Memo to Brandon Nimmo: that’s not the way you’re supposed to play baseball up here.

Nimmo didn’t collect a hit in his big-league debut, but perhaps he just was trying to fit in with the rest of his new teammates. He played right field ably and showed a veteran’s eye for the strike zone, which was […]

Last Man Not Standing

Well now. The Mets, baseball’s worst second-place, currently-qualified-for-postseason-play team, won a game that was alternately exasperating, entertaining, frightening, amusing, and mostly befuddling.

If you missed it, Steven Matz cruised through four innings, facing the minimum and watching as the Mets put up an eight-spot against punching bag Aaron Blair. At which point everything — no really, everything — […]

Waiting for the Worst

It came at the end of Terry Collins‘s press conference, and might have been funny except for the fact that it wasn’t funny: the small manager with the large personality tried to exit stage left, then had a brief, unhappy colloquy with someone not shown by SNY’s cameras. Collins objected that there hadn’t been any […]