The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com. (Sorry, but we have no interest in ads, sponsored content or guest posts.)

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

Let's Play Two-Thirds

Now there’s the ticket.

The Mets played six innings against the Phillies Wednesday night, which meant no disastrous fourth time through the order, no bullpen implosion, no horrifying defensive gaffe, no bats gone home early. Robert Gsellman looked aggressive and strong for five innings, less good for one inning, but then he was done. And the […]

Bad Game, Good Company

Emily and I spent yesterday getting Joshua settled in at boarding school, which was emotionally fraught, as expected, and also a lot of work. That second part was less expected — there were meetings and receptions, and I wound up assembling shelves and bookcases in a third-floor room in 88-degree heat.

I hadn’t bargained on that, […]

Cyclones Past and Present

Congratulations to Travis Taijeron, he of the almost-invariably mispronounced last name, on his first big-league hit.

And congratulations to Joey Votto for continuing to be Joey Votto. The Reds’ star demolished a ball thrown by Jeurys Familia for a home run, then gave high-fives, his bat and uniform top to a kid battling cancer. (And note […]

The Worst Loss That Means the Least

Tuesday night’s game against the Reds wasn’t the worst loss of the season, because by now it doesn’t particularly hurt to see the Mets hurl balls places where they don’t belong, or stare at enemy home runs, or struggle pathetically in the quicksand of their own misfortune. We’re all used to that by now; there […]

A Case of the Nopes

I missed the first game of Sunday’s day-night doubleheader, but it was for a baseball-related reason: we took the Staten Island ferry to get our first look at the 2017 Brooklyn Cyclones.

It hasn’t exactly been going well down on Coney Island — the Cyclones are last in their division and have a .266 winning percentage, […]

And We Crawl Along

Congratulations to Travis Taijeron for making his big-league debut after seven seasons in the minors — the last three spent at Las Vegas. With his 29th birthday looming, Taijeron had to be thinking he’d been pigeonholed as an organizational player, one whose impressive numbers at Triple-A wouldn’t interest his front office or anybody else’s beyond […]

Bring Your Kids to See Our Kids

In the summer of 1977, with Tom Seaver exiled to Cincinnati, the Mets tried to lure fans back to Shea Stadium with the cheery come-on “bring your kids to see our kids.”

It didn’t work — nothing short of M. Donald Grant’s public execution would have worked under the circumstances — but this month I keep […]

Losing the Way We'd Prefer It Not Be

Losing with the kids is OK, at least as I see it — tonight Amed Rosario hit a home run (awesome) and nearly got thrown out to end the game stretching a double into a triple (yikes don’t do that). And Kevin McGowan escaped ghost status, keeping the roster of Mets ghostsat nine.

On the other […]

Losing the Way It Oughta Be

The Mets lost, and it was annoying — after a drought in the clutch, they came back to tie the game against the Diamondbacks and their dreadful uniforms, forcing the business of determining a winner to extra innings.

Then Erik Goeddel came on as the latest reliever, and it was immediately clear that he didn’t have […]

An Elder Statesman Exits

The Mets’ flaccid, meaningless loss to the Marlins was prelude to the real news of the day: the trade of Curtis Granderson and cash to the Dodgers for the curious return of a player to be named later … or cash.

The sheer Wilponitude of that transaction is irritating — to my admittedly inexpert eye this […]