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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Not Forgettable But Best Forgotten

One of my favorite parts of a new baby season is how for a little while you can remember every game.

We lost that horror show in KC, then played well and won a squeaker, walloped the Phils, then lost that taut little one the next night.

See? Easy. Depending on your attentiveness and memory, you’ll be able […]

An Invitation Best Refused

It wasn’t exactly on my bucket list — unless you’re redefining the term to mean “stuff that makes me want to puke when I think about enduring it” — but I can now say I’ve been through an Opening Day that I was dreading.

Dreading Opening Day? What a bizarre thing for a lifelong fan to say. […]

February 17's Other Met

On February 17 we lost not one but two Mets.

There was no shortage of farewells for Tony Phillips, who died in Scottsdale, Ariz., at 56. And that was to be expected — Phillips racked up 2,023 hits over an 18-year career.

Brock Pemberton was the other Met who died on Feb. 17. His death at 62 in Ardmore, Okla., went largely […]

Sandlot Stars, Medical Degrees and Other Winter Tales

I’ve spent a good chunk of the winter sulking about Jeurys Familia quick-pitching or Yoenis Cespedes playing base-soccer or Daniel Murphy bringing the glove up or Cespedes charging off first on a soft liner or Terry Collins being too sentimental or Lucas Duda being unable to make a simple throw home or getting to the big stage […]

Welcome, THB Class of 2015!

Those of you who’ve waited with bated breath for this annual feature (pause for crickets), my apologies — blame paid work competing for my time and the curdling of my attitude about the 2015 World Series from acceptance to anger, a psychological ambush I’ll delve into one of these days.

Background: I have a trio of binders, long […]

The Murph Game

Daniel Murphy made an error. You probably noticed.

Murph’s error came in a house-of-horrors eighth inning at Citi Field, a frame that’s an excellent candidate to take up residence in the recesses of your brain, to be hauled out and fumed over at future 3 AMs.

But Murph wasn’t the only thing going bump in the night on what became a Halloween […]

Those Guys!

I love the way the Kansas City Royals play baseball. They’re impossible to strike out, they pressure defenses on the basepaths, and they play a wild-eyed, high-stepping game. Which is pretty much the way they look on infield defense too, smothering balls and getting filthy and recording outs.

It’s exciting, fun stuff.

The only problem with that — […]

Making a Good Plan Better

The Mets have used a simple formula to get past the Dodgers and 3/4 of the way past the Cubs:

Combine great starting pitching with a shutdown ninth inning.
Wait for Daniel Murphy to do something awesome.

It’s worked pretty well … but the Mets are adding ingredients to the recipe.

We’ll get back to the latest legends of Murphtober and […]

Pinch Me ... No Wait, Don't

The physicist Leonard Mlodinow has something to say about baseball narratives. This is from The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives (via this Freaknonomics post):

…if one team is good enough to warrant beating another in 55% of its games, the weaker team will nevertheless win a seven-game series about four times out of 10. And […]

Sometimes It's Simple

Baseball is a game played nine to a side, with wheeling motion and shifting fielding assignments and set plays and so much else. But each play starts not with nine people doing multiple things, but with one person doing one thing: The pitcher takes the ball and throws it in the direction of home plate.

When […]