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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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We Could Get Used to Winning

Need a scapegoat for your favorite fourth-place team in the whole wide world? Blame Dillon Gee for the pounding the Mets absorbed Thursday night in Milwaukee. Blame Matt Garza for maintaining the deep freeze at such a cold temperature where the New Yorkers’ bats were concerned. Blame gravity for pulling the Mets down to earth [...]

Kicking Ace & Taking Names

You know that feeling of serene confidence you get as a Mets fan when they give their pitcher an early lead? Probably not, but it’s been known to exist. It existed for me Tuesday night. I was as surprised as anybody that it did.

In the second, Mariner center fielder James Jones’s eyes proved bigger than [...]

How Bizarre? Kinda Bizarre

Steve Gelbs seems like a capable enough young broadcaster. We know him mostly from filling in for the singular Kevin Burkhardt on SNY, which, in the realm of roving reporting, is a little like starting Todd Pratt on Mike Piazza Poster Day. Pratt may perform ably — more than ably at his best — but [...]

Night Towel Edition

The baseball rhythms were back Friday night at 10:10, albeit uncomfortably time-shifted. You’d have preferred them back at 7:10 PM. You’d have preferred them back at 7:10 PM the previous Monday, actually. Who wanted a pause when the cause was so glorious, when the momentum was so momentous? Who wanted the Mets to pack up [...]

Everybody Rise!

People ask me what I do during the All-Star break when there’s no baseball. I’ll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for Friday night at 10.

The Mets finished beating the Marlins, 9-1, at approximately 4:30 Sunday afternoon. Remember that? It was so long ago, I can understand if you [...]

The Derek Jeter All-Star Break

They shoved Derek Jeter’s final All-Star appearance so far down our throats that it induced nausea. Or NAU2EA.

We were complicit, at least those among us who clicked or punched his name a composite 3,928,422 times out of desire or obligation to see the perennially underexposed shortstop at last get a little prime-time promotion. None of [...]

Now The Fun Stops?

Vast stretches of the current season could have served nicely as an All-Star break. Four days? The Mets could’ve taken off almost any four weeks there for a while and not have been much missed. But now? Now that we’ve decided we love them again? Now that they’ve decided to express their affection for us [...]

Eric Campbell and the News

“Step by step, one by one, higher and higher,” Huey Lewis sang after as scintillating a victory as the Mets have manufactured this year, describing to a tee the process by which our fellas are elevating themselves these days. They can’t win more than one game at a time any more than they can put [...]

Bang the Fish Briskly

“Lou Klimchock can be considered by virtue of his intense and persistent labors on behalf of innovative baseball mediocrity one of the few truly seminal figures in the drab and dreary history of this era. [...] Here’s to you Lou. You gave the common fan someone to identify with. You were a constant source of [...]

Nothing Trivial About Us

I hope there won’t be a quiz about the finer points of Thursday night’s Mets-Braves game. I’ve already forgotten most of what happened. I think I forgot it while I was dutifully watching all nine innings. I seem to recall Bartolo Colon not being sharp, then being very sharp, then being so sharp it seemed [...]