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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Play It Again, Ike

Technology, you magnificent bastard, I could just kiss you…or open your iKiss app and click on it hard. You showed us Juan Lagares was safe at second in the ninth inning Saturday despite his being called out. More importantly, you showed Jim Kelly, Mets video replay coordinator (as new a title as baseball can confer), [...]

Not Losing Feels Better Than Losing

Utter pessimism is dead! Long live tempered pessimism!

Losing, Lewis Grizzard once wrote, hurts worse than winning feels good. We’ve known plenty from losing and hurting. We’re only now processing again how winning feels. I’m not certain. After the 0-3 start that weighed 0-30 in Met-ric emotional tonnage, the simple act of not losing feels pretty [...]

Follow the Sun

Back in the day, the Mets confined most of their April home games to afternoons. The thinking went something like this: it gets cold here at night. You might even say it gets bitter.

Thursday the Mets went back to the day, a scheduling decision we “20,561” on hand (an accurate figure if you count inner [...]

Meet the Mets, Indonesia

Longtime Friend of FAFIF Ben Nathan, who in 2010 gave us his dissertation on why Jerry Manuel was a Woodrow Wilson for our 20-inning times, continues to put his mind to only the finest intellectual pursuits. Of late he has been in Indonesia teaching schoolchildren. And what has Ben been teaching them?

Why, to Meet the [...]

The Cost of Hope

One of the benefits of sticking around to the final out when many have flocked despairingly to the exits in the face of howling winds and widening deficits is seeing things you wouldn’t believe if you didn’t experience them for yourself. Minutes after Jason bolted the imminent initial Met demise of 2014, he was joined [...]

Like a Room Without a Roof

I stumbled into a realization a few weeks ago: baseball is a metaphor for baseball. It’s not a metaphor for life. It doesn’t serve as our symbolic rebirth or any of that folderol. Opening Day means that after too many months without regulation games, we get one, to be followed almost immediately by another, and [...]

The Beat Before the Tweet

The headline didn’t have much on The Onion. “Farnsworth,” it reported, “rides bus without being Met.” Well, I thought, that’s too bad. It would have been nice if somebody had picked up Farnsworth, but sometimes you just have to walk home from the bus stop.

Of course it didn’t require much of a double-take to realize [...]

Breaking In & Going Out

Someday Spring Training will end, and when it does…what’s that? It’s over? More or less?

Didn’t see that coming.

Hallelujah, the Mets are done with grapefruits and slot machines at last, saving a couple of days here near March’s conclusion for un petit peu de poutine up Montreal way. Nice to pretend the Expos exist again for [...]

The Ghost of Ike Davis

There’s a scene in a church in one of my wife’s and my favorite movies, The Commitments. A lady, dutifully scraping away at the hardened wax countless candles have dripped in the name of divine intervention, rhetorically asks, “If ya didn’t do it for God, who would ya do it for?”

We were going to watch [...]

Deconstructing Harvey

The infrastructure of a baseball season encompasses a surfeit of components that don’t show up in the box score, including intramural dustups in March that dissolve into the murkiest of memories by May. They are as much part of the National Pastime landscape as the crack of the bat, the flight of the ball, the [...]