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Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Lucky and Good

The first-place Mets, you might say, were lucky Tuesday night. True, they lost for the fifth time in seven games — 6-2 to the Braves — but they won a valuable square foot of real estate in their march toward the National League East title when the Nationals lost to the Orioles. Their magic number […]

The Disturbingly Unknown Quantity

Saturday’s was one of those games in which you tend to focus on one key element that went awry until you realize the other key element never went anywhere and thus rendered the first key element’s awryness moot. Noah Syndergaard, Terry Collins said, threw two bad pitches. Your impulse will be to obsess on those two […]

City Noise

I’d love to tell you I just got around to writing this after staying out all night partying because there’s nothing like the Mets beating the Yankees in the first game of a Subway Series…WOO! But, honestly, I fell asleep not long after Friday night’s contest ended and couldn’t get myself going early this morning.

Nevertheless, […]

Here’s to the Non-Winners

I like to say that all you can reasonably ask for from your team year after year is that they give you hope. To me, that has always implied that you can hope your team will contend in earnest for a postseason berth, and to do that, your team has to win more games than […]

Meaning and Games in September

I can’t take me anywhere. I can, but I can’t depend on me to respond as social norms suggest I should.

I took myself to Citi Field Tuesday night at the invitation of a friend. The ostensible lure was the manifestation of that old Wilponian chestnut, Meaningful Games In September, MGIS for short (mishegas for our […]

Toss It On the Pile With the Rest of Them

World War II ended in 1945, yet there were handfuls of particularly stubborn Japanese soldiers in far-flung outposts who hadn’t gotten word or refused to believe what they were told about their nation’s surrender. One, Hiroo Onoda, was found to still be fighting a war that was no longer in progress as late as 1974.

And […]

A Momentarily Magical Number

Bartolo Colon presumably sets eight or nine major league records every time he steps on a major league field, so it’s understandable if this one escaped the bookkeepers’ notice. To be fair, it’s probably not a record, but I’m gonna say it is.

By defeating the Atlanta Braves, 7-2, on a rain-delayed Thursday night/Friday morning at […]

The Sound of One Team Racing

For consistency’s sake, we shall continue to refer to the state of affairs in which we’ve been thoroughly immersed as a pennant race, even if ours is the only team any longer racing.

Mathematical niceties demand we maintain on our faces an expression of severe purposefulness when the subjects of games ahead and games remaining arise. […]

Come On, Let the Provin’ Begin

The team that was a surefire bet to cruise to another division title got off to a rocky start. But then they began to right the ship, they had their pitching lined up, and once September rolled around, they took dead aim at first place, inching closer and closer day by day until they were […]

That Harvey

Throughout my childhood and into my adolescence, if I had to see the dentist, I was dragged from Long Beach to some deteriorating section of Brooklyn. We stayed loyal to our family dentist even though our family had left that deteriorating section of Brooklyn six months before I was born (later I’d find out that […]