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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The Game That Wouldn’t Get Away

Sometimes you look at the screen and you know you’re doomed. Then you look at the tiny score bug in the corner of the screen and realize you’re not. You’re losing in all facets of the game, especially on the scoreboard, but it hits you after a while that the game is neither over nor […]

Angles in the Outfield

Let’s see what we’ve got in the outfield:

Cespedes in left. Lagares in center. Granderson in right.

No, Conforto in left. Cespedes in center. Granderson in right.

Wait, Cespedes doesn’t want to play center. As dinged up as he’s been, and given how important it is to keep him in the lineup, it’s probably best to accede to […]

That is Mets Baseball

I traveled to the Meadowlands a couple of Septembers ago for a Giants game. In the first series executed by the home team, a run for four yards on 3rd and 1 produced a first down. My host for the afternoon, as True Blue a fan as there is, could not have been happier to […]

The New Marlins

I can’t prove it, but Met losses to the Phillies are the most annoying losses there are. The Phillies have become the new Marlins.

Move over, Miami. You’re no longer quite that team.

All losses are the worst, and I don’t doubt that if you catch me after a defeat at the hands of the Dodgers, the […]

Familia In The End

When the Mets’ lineup was first posted in the late afternoon, I stared at it blankly. It might as well have been nine total strangers. I knew they were they players on my team, I knew I had waited for my team to begin playing again, I just didn’t feel any connection to their identities.

When […]

The Meaningful Exhibition Game

Do you remember R.A. Dickey shutting down the Mets last June in Toronto and then letting it be known he was pitching a couple of days after his father’s death? Taking the ball was something his manager, John Gibbons, said he felt he had to do. That stayed with me in light of my father […]

Cruel To Be Kind

The 2016 baseball season began approximately ten minutes ago and is now more than half over. It has tied the major league record for how quickly time flies, set in every other baseball season. Even the ones that drag zip by before you know it.

Embroidered in the fabric of the baseball season to remind us […]

Uncle Murph

I’ve got one word for Daniel Murphy, and it’s not because he’s the brother of either of my parents, because he’s not. The word is “Uncle.”

I’ll say it again: Uncle, as in stop it, stop it, stop it. I give.

You’re the man. You never should have been allowed to escape to Washington. You should’ve been […]

The Way We Look to a Distant Constellation

We were excited in August of 2013. Reasonably excited, anyway. The Mets were 13½ games out of first place and 10 behind in the Wild Card stakes when the month began, so I wouldn’t oversell the euphoria angle. Yet as fans of teams that are not contending will, we readily embraced the chance to meet […]

The Strangest Dream

I came home from Closing Day today, still a little miffed that Jose Reyes pulled himself from the game the second he got to first. I didn’t mind the protecting of his .337 average. But he couldn’t have stayed on the bag another minute? Who pinch-runs for Jose Reyes if he’s not injured?

Teddy Ballgame, it […]