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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Harvey Here; Hairston Here; Hope Here?

If a pitcher can be deemed “major league” after two starts, Matt Harvey would seem to be it. His lifetime mark has dropped to 1-1, which isn’t an accurate reflection of how well he pitched against the Giants Tuesday night and — whatever we think of the usefulness of pitchers’ won-lost records — probably doesn’t [...]

50 Years & Nowhere Near .500

In lieu of weekend results to chew over, let us celebrate June 6, 1972, for on that Tuesday night at Shea, Tommie Agee knocked in Jim Beauchamp with the go-ahead run in the seventh inning, while Jim McAndrew and Tug McGraw combined on a five-hit, 3-2 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. In the short term, [...]

Never Say Die, Always Say Hope

The Mets never say die, but sometimes they die anyway. They won’t say die for the next 45 games but I suspect what remains unspoken will occur more or less half the time no matter their best intentions.

Of the choice between “more or less,” more would certainly be preferable. When a team that isn’t supposed [...]

Like Tom Terrific Said

One of the formative stories for me as a Mets fan comes from 1969. As it’s told in George Vecsey’s marvelous Joy in Mudville, after the Mets reached 18-18 with a win over the Braves, reporters entered the clubhouse expecting “a wild champagne party,” but found the Mets drinking postgame beers and sodas as usual. [...]