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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Finding Meaning in Meaninglessness

The Atlanta Braves are going to the playoffs, which meant on Friday night the Mets faced a lineup that featured a handful of Atlanta’s young frontline players but not its older ones — a sop to hangover recovery times, perhaps. That made the game meaningless multiple times over, with no chance for the Mets to […]

Use Your Illusion

During one of the many, many, many one-run losses that have defined the blur of futility that has smothered the illusion of a pennant race in these parts, I asked my friend of nearly 30 years Rob Emproto how things were going with his band. It’s not really “his” band, but it’s not like I […]

The Hare, the Tortoise and Other Strange Creatures

Even by the Mets’ standard of absurdity, the first game of Saturday’s doubleheader was something: A stately chug out to a 9-0 lead, unbelievably blowing that 9-0 lead, then somehow winning anyway. (Followed by the seemingly inevitable hangover loss.)

For me the game was a blogger’s version of the tortoise and the hare: A couple of minutes […]

Don't Remain Calm, All Is Not Well

As baseball fans, we react. Unable to actually alter the course of events transpiring down there on the field, we overreact. And trying to outguess baseball is a surefire way to look like a fool.

Still. It’s what we do. We react, we overreact, we turn dots into lines and fill in pictures. Like this one: […]

A Day of Halves

You know what? I’ve come around on the idea of the Mets playing the Pirates again right after the All-Star Break.

Not because I think the Pirates are a bunch of tomato cans — that’s a dangerous thing to think about any opponent, and if the Bucs win Sunday they’ll have split the series — but […]

As Night Follows Day

Stop me if you’ve heard these before:

1) The Mets win a thriller of a first game of a jury-rigged doubleheader.
2) The Mets drop an uninspiring second game of the same jury-rigged doubleheader.
3) WTF seven-inning doubleheaders?

We’ve been down this two-lane highway that runs out of regulation road too soon too many times to count efficiently of […]

Seventh Time’s a Seventh Charm?

One half of a season is behind the New York Mets and so is the rest of the National League East. You can’t ask for a much better situation following 81 games. The chips don’t settle that way very often.

The Mets have finished the statistical first half in first place six times previously. They’ve won […]

A Day to Fly the Colors

By definition, a Sunday afternoon spent beating a pair of American League All-Stars en route to winning by five is time well spent.

That’s what the Mets did on July 4, racking up four runs in 3 1/3 innings off All-Star Gerrit Cole, whose situations were as sticky as his grip might no longer be, and […]

Cheyenne Sunshine

Brandon Nimmo brightened the grim Bronx skies Saturday afternoon. Is there anything that ray of light can’t do?

Nimmo, like Jeff McNeil and Michael Conforto fairly recently, returned from the injured list and reminded us that, oh yeah, we had players in place before we fell in love with players who replaced them, and we liked […]

The Shadow of the Past

I was uneasy about Wednesday night, as if the shadow of the past was reaching out for the Mets. It started with news that Jed Lowrie is alive and well and back in Oakland, perfectly ambulatory and hitting home runs now that his knee has been surgically repaired. It turns out, in whatever the opposite […]