The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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A Beautiful Night in the Neighborhood

Joe Posnanski, who writes lyrically and frequently about baseball, published a breezy piece last week titled “Ranking the Stadiums,” in which he identified Citi Field as one of the majors’ “Underrated Ballparks,” alongside Comerica Park and Angel Stadium. He elaborated, “I actually don’t know if Citi Field is underrated  —  I suspect most people who […]

Statues With Limitations

I want to believe we’ll beat the Braves on Opening Day (you never know) and finish substantially ahead of them this season (probably, but I take nothing as a given). What’s sad is that Atlanta has lifted the lid on SunTrust Park — their fifteenth home in eighteen years — by moving ahead of us in […]

The View's No Better Out Here

I went 615 miles to see the Mets and they didn’t look any better than they do at home.

More like the Mehs.

Meet the Mehs, meet the Mehs
It seems they’re half-asleep, the Mehs

A few months ago Emily and I decided on an August ballpark tour: fly to Cleveland and see a game, drive to Detroit for a […]

(Almost) All The Way

You know you’re having a good night when you can get picky over what kind of mammoth win you’d like your team to post. For those of us who remained to the bottom of the ninth inning at Citi Field Wednesday night of an obviously settled affair — and why would you leave when your […]

The Good ... and the Rest

From the Better Late Than Never Department:

The best thing about Wednesday night’s tilt with the Nationals, from my admittedly parochial perspective? It was getting to talk baseball with my blog partner, something we hadn’t done since the Daniel Murphy Game last October and hadn’t really done then, since at the time we were too busy […]

Upgrades You Won’t Find Anywhere Else

Not to look past Opening Night in Kansas City, let alone the Mets’ last chance to end Spring Training without a loss or tie already yet, but what’s incredibly hard to believe is that in a week’s time, Citi Field will be filled again.

I’ve really come around on the ol’ ballpark, probably because a pennant […]

The Murph Game

Daniel Murphy made an error. You probably noticed.

Murph’s error came in a house-of-horrors eighth inning at Citi Field, a frame that’s an excellent candidate to take up residence in the recesses of your brain, to be hauled out and fumed over at future 3 AMs.

But Murph wasn’t the only thing going bump in the night on what became a Halloween […]

Images To Last A Lifetime

I just got my mental images developed from the World Series. Wanna see ’em? They’re right here in this envelope.

This is one of me all excited to realize I’m going to a World Series game for the first time in my life. No, I wasn’t there any of the other times the Mets were in […]

Don’t Let Go, Mets

The Greatest Show on Murph continues. Every postseason night, a supremely credentialed starting pitcher faces the New York Mets and every postseason night, Daniel Murphy trumps that ace, converting him into just another overwhelmed spectator craning his neck in a venue jammed with gobsmacked gawkers. Clayton Kershaw, Zack Greinke, Jon Lester and now Jake Arrieta […]

Sometimes It's Simple

Baseball is a game played nine to a side, with wheeling motion and shifting fielding assignments and set plays and so much else. But each play starts not with nine people doing multiple things, but with one person doing one thing: The pitcher takes the ball and throws it in the direction of home plate.

When […]