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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Summer Blockbuster Goes Awry

It’s 10½ games to first place, we got one healthy starting outfielder, half a season, it’s morning, and we have a game before noon.
—Elwood Blues, if he were a Mets fan

Saturday afternoon, shortly past 2:10 PM Metropolitan Promotional Time, I entered Citi Field clutching an Asdrubal Cabrera bobblehead and overcome by a vision. In my […]

Baseball Like It Taut’a Be

Some games words filter into your brain. The word of the night Friday was “taut,” as in nice and tight, the way you’d figure someone who intermittently devotes himself to baseball as something of an academic discipline would like it. Give a student of the game a 2-1 affair won by his favorite team and […]

The Grandersonian Presence

Don’t remind Ray Ramirez that Curtis Granderson is still out there, still playing, still hitting, still in one piece. Ramirez, or our conception of Ramirez as grim reaper of Met body parts, eventually gets everybody. He doesn’t get Granderson, though. Three-and-a-half years into a four-year contract, Grandy stands on two feet that he puts one […]

The Grass Is Sometimes Browner on the Other Side

Can we play the Giants for the rest of the year?

Let’s be clear about something: the Mets’ three-game sweep of San Francisco doesn’t mean they’re suddenly good. They’re just better than the Giants, for whom “can’t get out of their own way” would be a kind assessment. The Giants are having a once-in-several-generations cratering of […]

A Pip of a Win

Gladys Knight wasn’t wrong when she concluded, over radios everywhere as 1973 became 1974, that she really had to use her imagination to keep on keepin’ on. Yet her compadres the Pips couldn’t have been more right when they offered her this message of positive reinforcement:

You’re too strong not to keep on keepin’ on.

If you’ve […]

Dansby Rotten Scoundrel

What an impressive young man, that Dansby Swanson. The cut of his jib is first-rate, tip-top, simply splendid. Let me show you a few choice selections from his defensive portfolio Friday night…

Hmm, I can’t seem to find any of them. Why, that Dansby Swanson seems to have leapt as from out of nowhere and snatched […]

Something Wheeler This Way Comes

My preferences have little impact on determining the outcome of baseball games I sit down to watch, or maybe you’ve noticed the unbroken winning streak the Mets haven’t been on for the past five decades. Nevertheless, I decided I was going to be reasonably content with a Mets loss Wednesday night provided Zack Wheeler and […]

Fume After Watching

If there was a way to lose Wednesday night, the Mets were going to find it.

The bullpen was terrible. The bullpen was terribly managed. The hitters turned a gimme into a gag me. Just a complete and utter disaster.

Insult to injury: said meltdown came against the Padres, who sure don’t look like a team capable […]

Please Proceed, Marlins

An old maxim of pretty much everything is never to interrupt your opponent while (s)he’s making a mistake. With that credo in mind, the Mets essentially sat back on a drizzly Saturday night and let the Marlins do whatever that was they were doing instead of playing baseball.

The Mets have their issues, goodness knows, beginning with […]

The Glass is 16 Runs Full

Neil Walker apparently forgot how many outs there were. Jose Reyes ensured there were more outs than there should have been. Jacob deGrom walked five batters, gave up five runs and barely made it through five innings. Glenn Sherlock betrayed a fetishistic fondness for red lights when green would have been the stylish choice. Curtis […]