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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Changing of the ’Gaard

When you’re sending your ace of aces out to face the dregs of the dregs, you can’t help but have high hopes…high in the sky apple pie hopes. In this corner, we had the undefeated Matt Harvey, author of the best day (sometimes two days) of every week. In the other corner, there sat the […]

Magic City

Your baseball instincts weren’t hopelessly off and you weren’t necessarily wrong. Well, for one night, yes, but don’t worry. There’s still plenty of time for what you were sure was going to happen to happen. It usually does — 24 separate occasions over the past 19 seasons are evidence that you weren’t concocting worst-case scenarios […]

Pinch-Me Days

I’ve been thinking of this one game. I was in Connecticut. The Mets were in Atlanta. They were playing the Braves on a Saturday night and Dillon Gee wasn’t very good.

Since that game I’ve driven back to New York, worked my butt off for three days and nights, flown to California where I spent three days at a Star […]

The One That Didn’t Get Away

In most parallel universes, the Mets lost Thursday night. They had to.

They were playing the Marlins.

Giancarlo Stanton went traditionally deep.

They were playing the Marlins.

Martin Prado added his own four cents.

They were playing the Marlins.

Dillon Gee pitched gamefully but not quite well enough to fully extricate himself from his last tangle of trouble.

They were playing the […]

A Sense of Occasion

I’ve been a baseball fan a very long time, but once a year, depending on the circumstances, I’m talked to like I’ve just discovered the game.

Ironically, it didn’t happen when I was relatively new to baseball. When I was a kid, the issue at hand was helpfully childlike in its simplicity. It went something like […]

Jerry's Kids Grow Up

Welcome to FAFIF Turns Ten, a milestone-anniversary series in which we consider anew some of the topics that have defined Mets baseball during our first decade of blogging. In this installment, we notice how Met turnover subtly became Met stability.

There was an article in the Washington Post the other day that fascinated me. It informed […]

While You & Your Team Were Sleeping

Good morning. In case you missed Tuesday night’s late Mets game in Oakland, the previously slumping A’s won by a comfortable margin; the Mets collected more than their customary four hits, but to no avail; Travis d’Arnaud homered with nobody on; Dillon Gee struggled through five and two-thirds innings; Gonzalez Germen wasn’t particularly effective in […]

Same Old Phillies, Same New Mets

How is it that a lineup loaded with ballplayers who jammed the box score of a World Series clincher can appear so routinely beatable? The dichotomy in perception probably has something to do with a temporal gap, what with that particular World Series having taken place in 2008 and the beating in question proceeding in […]

Time Flies When You're Having Mets

Round numbers are all the rage these days. Tuesday night, the Mets put their 4,000th win in the books. Wednesday night, I scribbled my 600th game in the Log.

That’s 600 official Mets games that have counted: regular-season and postseason, whether at Shea, Citi Field or one of eleven ballparks where I’ve rendezvoused with them on […]

The Hurly Shuffle

There are nights when you love how much you love sports. And then there are nights like Wednesday when you prefer to drown your sporting sorrows in prime time soap operas.

The Nets, who occasionally lift my spirits in spite of my knowing that eventually they will find a way to pull them down, mishandle them […]