The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The Death of Maybes

Well, Emily and I had fun for eight innings.

It was a lovely night, we warmed up for the game with my wife’s first-ever visit to Donovan’s (I wouldn’t say it’s the best burger in New York City, but it’s very good — a bar burger executed perfectly), and during the mid innings I got to […]

Bracing One's Self (Or Trying To)

Nostalgia is a product of dissatisfaction and rage. It’s a settling of grievances between the present and the past.

That’s Don DeLillo, in the great novel White Noise — and a quote that was uncomfortably top of mind as I watched the Mets make outs and drop balls and get whacked around by the Texas Rangers’ […]

Bag Back on Head

The little black cloud narrative of Mets fandom has been overdone in recent years — our team was one good swing away from the World Series in 2006 and played highly meaningful games on the last day of the season in 2007 and 2008, which the good people of Pittsburgh and Kansas City would take […]

They Call It a Loss

I wanted the Mets to win because I’m a Mets fan. That part’s pretty obvious. They’re my company for the good-weather part of the year, an unscripted nightly show. When that show ends well I’m happy. When it doesn’t, I’m not.

I wanted the Mets to win because I like R.A. Dickey. I like the way […]

4-70

Actually the Mets aren’t 4-70. They’re 4-7, which is considerably different — smack dab in the middle of “small sample size” territory, within the bounds of which no wise person draws conclusions. And even if you can’t resist the temptation, a bit of further, mostly non-quantified reflection should be enough to coax you off the […]

Died Hard, But Still Died

It’s an age-old fan question: Your team’s down seven runs, and not destined to win. Given this, how would you prefer them to exit stage final? Biting and scratching and clawing, even if all’s in vain? Or quickly and quietly, so as not to waste valuable pluck and luck? (Pluck and luck don’t actually work […]

You (Usually) Can't Go Home Again

Like my blog partner, I registered the wholly unexpected presence of Jason Isringhausen in Mets camp — and, however briefly, allowed myself to dream.

Stories like Izzy’s are an object lesson in why it’s good that fans don’t run baseball teams. The reaction of the Sandy Alderson braintrust to Izzy’s availability, I’m sure, was a businesslike […]

Of Sighs and Steinbrenner

Hate to break it to any of you who were keeping your October clear, but my co-blogger’s scenario has been thwarted, and the Mets have been eliminated from postseason play.

It’s fitting, somehow, that we’d be eliminated in a game that descended from taut but aggravating (rejuvenated Lucas Duda hitting an artillery shell of a home […]

Poison Pen

Checking in on the Mets from afar — There was only hit, and it was by Hamels? K-Rod did what? — while bouncing around between Florida and Rhode Island and various airports, I didn’t quite realize how mad I was at them. Until I sat down to watch an otherwise anonymous, playing-out-the-string game in Houston […]

Next Year Comes Early

By now I’m not even mad at them.

No, the worst I can manage while watching the Mets stagger around and lose is a weary exasperation. The competitive portion of the 2010 season is nearing its end, and whatever disappointment I felt over that has dissipated by now. You never know, as baseball sages will tell […]