The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Let's Play One

The Mets and Marlins were supposed to play two baseball games starting at 4:10 pm, but at 4:10 pm it was raining.

Not particularly hard — you could almost call it Corey Oswalt weather — but hard enough. It stayed that way through 5:10 pm, through 6:10 pm, through the time the Mets would have played […]

First the Party, Then the Hangover

Joy of excess? Oh baby, we hadn’t seen anything yet.

Game 1 of Thursday’s doubleheader against the Phils was a rain of records, superlatives and astonished exclamations. Twenty-four runs, a new club record. Twenty-five hits, a new club record for a nine-inning game. A 20-run margin of victory, also a new club record.

Weirdly, the crazy 24-4 outburst […]

Waiting for Larry

Five of us had tickets for the entire Mets-Phillies twi-night doubleheader Monday. More than five, according to official attendance figures, but I refer specifically to myself, the three people with whom I’ve been friends longer than anybody and the son of one of those people. I showed […]

Too Much and Yet Just Enough

In the ninth inning of Monday’s nightcap, which if memory serves ended about an hour ago if it’s not in fact still going on, Braves pinch-hitter Dustin Peterson tried to take first base on ball three. The various onlookers laughed; so did I. It had been a long, often ridiculous day and night that by […]

Mets Fail to Completely Screw Up

The Mets played two baseball games on Monday and they were both pretty terrible, even by the low standards of fans who are staring six baseball-free months in the face and would normally take extras with no questions asked.

The first game muddled along without too much horror until the middle innings and then fell apart, […]

Like Day and Night

Technically, Sunday afternoon’s Mets win over the Nationals was the day half of a day-night doubleheader, but you’d be excused for confusion in that the day game itself proceeded like day and night from a Met perspective. Maybe that was appropriate at the end of a week that commenced with a solar eclipse.

DAY BREAKS: Asdrubal […]

A Tie That Felt Like a Win

Maybe I was just in a good mood.

Emily and I were supposed to be back Monday night — Portland, Me., is an easy 45 minutes or so away by plane. But Monday night’s rainout also scratched our plane, shifting us to a 5:30 am departure Tuesday. Ugh … and then they cancelled that one too, telling […]

.500 In Miniature

When your team has been immersed in an era of losing, your main ambition for them is that they start winning. Or at least stop losing more than they win. Nobody aspires to be .500 unless you can’t get and stay there. We haven’t gotten there and then beyond it for keeps since 2008. Hence, […]

The Twinight Zone

Please come to Denver
With the snowfall…
—Dave Loggins

Submitted for your approval…nah, scratch that. Who here would approve of anything the Mets did Tuesday night in the city that’s been their personal Twilight Zone for two decades? Not fans of the Mets. Certainly not fans of crisp, clean baseball. Perhaps fans of the Rockies, but honestly, those […]

The Original Craig Anderson

If you’re a Mets fan who likes to read, read George Vecsey recounting his recent visit with 1962-1964 Met pitcher Craig Anderson, who finished his career on an 18-game losing streak but not before he crammed two wins into one day, fifty years ago tomorrow. For a man whose name became statistically synonymous with “loss,” […]