The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com.

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

Not Losing Feels Better Than Losing

Utter pessimism is dead! Long live tempered pessimism!

Losing, Lewis Grizzard once wrote, hurts worse than winning feels good. We’ve known plenty from losing and hurting. We’re only now processing again how winning feels. I’m not certain. After the 0-3 start that weighed 0-30 in Met-ric emotional tonnage, the simple act of not losing feels pretty [...]

That's Why He's Santa

If you are a spiritual descendant of Virginia of “yes, Virginia…” fame this Christmas Day, you may want to take the following observation with a grain of salt or at least an ounce of nog.

When the Mets were done hosting Queens schoolchildren last week and the player who took on the role of Santa Claus [...]

The Better Side of Nostalgia

I’m going to deal with the lousy part of the day first, because I don’t want it to be the last thing on the page when you’re done reading.

Frank Francisco got a called strike three, the Mets shook hands and then threw their hats into the crowd, and the video board started replaying the highlights [...]

A Wheeler's Dozen

You know what Doc Gooden’s typical pitch count was when he was regularly registering double-digit strikeouts in 1984? Neither do I. It never occurred to me to ask. The only pitches any Mets fan was counting 29 years ago were the ones that resulted in strike three. That was the fun of the greatest new [...]

Bounce in Our Step

Relax, all right? Don’t try to strike everybody out. Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they’re fascist. Throw some ground balls, it’s more democratic. — Bull Durham

The forecast was ominous: likely rain.

Yeah right.

The raindrops remained at a respectful distance, because they — like the rest of us — wanted to watch Matt [...]

Defeat's Jaws Left Barren, Baffled

FLUSHING, N.Y. (FAFIF) — The Jaws of Defeat expressed bafflement after being certain it had secured the New York Mets within its formidable bite at Citi Field Tuesday night.

“Huh?” the bewildered Jaws of Defeat asked. “Where did the Mets go? I was sure I had them.”

The Mets indeed appeared all but ensconced inside the Jaws [...]

Like Royal and Water

I’m pretty sure the Mets won their game Friday night. Score says they did. My memory says they did. Eric Young, Jr., tossing his helmet into the air before stomping on home plate amid a sea of orange-trimmed blue jerseys says they did.

So why doesn’t it feel more festive? Probably because, in descending order of [...]

That Outfield

Byrderers Row lives. Was it worth the call from the governor?

The energized, fun-size Mets…the ones with an honest-to-god top of the order…the ones whose outfield is no longer a punch line but is arguably a strength…they remain as they’ve been for the past six or so weeks. These are the Mets on which Marlon Byrd [...]

Rooting For A Brave

Strange how one minute Wednesday night’s game was all about Tim Hudson and the next minute Wednesday night’s game was all about Tim Hudson, yet in a totally different realm come that critical second minute. First Hudson’s impenetrable to every orange-jerseyed Mets batter. Then he’s vulnerable to one Mets runner, and the next thing you [...]

Mets Loss Considered Mildly Surprising

The Mets used to go down to defeat pretty easily. At best, they practiced a form of passive-aggressive behavior that dared otherwise reluctant opponents to remain on the field long enough to incidentally vanquish them. It often manifested in 15- or 20-inning episodes of offensive ineptitude, but you didn’t leave those losses feeling that if [...]