The blog for Mets fans
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Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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A Beaten People Rising Up

Citi Field is loud, and it’s wonderful.

I reflexively started to type “loud again,” then stopped myself. Because that wouldn’t have been true. Citi never has been loud. This is the first run of games in which the crowd is a factor, in which the buzz is focused on the field and the players are aware of […]

Rather Be Us Than Them

For the second night in a row, the Mets lost a one-run game amid a relapse of Narcoleptic Offense Syndrome. On Saturday night the problem was compounded by Noah Syndergaard having an off-night; on Sunday Bartolo Colon was good enough to win, but the Mets’ attack against hyperactive Chris Archer (who must cover at least two […]

The Chance We Wanted

I no longer remember the exact circumstances, but years ago there was a newspaper story featuring a Yankee fan who didn’t understand why any franchise would adopt “Ya Gotta Believe” (or one of its non-spontaneous, corporate-approved descendants) as a rallying cry. Terrible slogan, she snorted dismissively: “Believe? That’s lame. We know.”

That always struck me as a perfect way to describe the two New York fanbases, because strip […]

The Cheers for Wilmer

There have been more exhausting 48-hour stretches in the life of a Mets fan — the desperate scramble at the end of the ’99 season comes to mind — but not for a very long time. And perhaps there’s never been such an insane rollercoaster of emotions over so few hours, with euphoria, anger, confusion, despair, and […]

Another Surreal Night in Panic City

OK, so …



Seriously, how the hell do you start?

Wednesday night’s game was weird before it began, but we had No Idea.

Even before Will Venable headed for the plate to start the top of the first, Twitter was buzzing with rumors: The Mets were close to a deal, and it was for a bat — a […]

Leading the League in Agita

The Mets, for all the agita surrounding them, went to the other side of a fair continent and returned with a 4-2 trip. That’s not bad. In fact, it’s pretty far from bad.

So why are so many Mets fans — most definitely including me — so prone to rending of garments, gnashing of teeth and […]

Weird Game, Weird Season

The Mets didn’t lose, though it kind of feels that way.

2015 isn’t a flaming disaster, though it kind of feels that way.

What’s going on here?

Reality check: The Mets beat the Diamondbacks, 6-2. It’s the early hours of June 5 and they are in first place.

So why doesn’t it feel that way? Why does it feel […]

Day in the Sun

It’s an odd feeling when you’re away from your team and they’re doing poorly. You’re a bit relieved, because in your normal life you’d have flushed three hours down the drain but instead you get the bad news via a glance at a phone, paper or distant TV and then get on with whatever it […]

Pinch-Me Days

I’ve been thinking of this one game. I was in Connecticut. The Mets were in Atlanta. They were playing the Braves on a Saturday night and Dillon Gee wasn’t very good.

Since that game I’ve driven back to New York, worked my butt off for three days and nights, flown to California where I spent three days at a Star […]

The New Old Normal

I’m getting old. It happens to everybody, to their astonishment. I’ll be 46 in a month — which isn’t ancient if you’re 56 or 66 or north of there but unfathomable at 16 or 26.

A funny thing about age, as I lean into it: Your frame of reference for time changes so thoroughly that you […]