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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Murphy's Met Law

Some Met — I can’t remember whom and it’s resisting my Googling skills, so let’s just say it was Ron Swoboda — once noted that fans have it tougher than the players, because the players can do something, while the fans have to sit there and watch. Is it so? I’ve seen the photo of [...]

The High Water Mark of Something

On Friday night, after getting to be part of a conversation with Dwight Gooden, Greg and I were in the right-field stands, watching Matt Harvey finish up his domination of the Nationals.

“How is it this team isn’t in first place?” I asked him. “Doesn’t it feel like they should be?”

That’s what a 7-4 road trip [...]

You Might Miss Something

Missing a ballgame because you’re in Cooperstown is a pretty acceptable excuse — this weekend, for the second year in a row, my wife’s family gathered there and prowled the Hall of Fame. (Foreshadowing: Last year I was in the plaque gallery, headphones in ears, when Kirk Nieuwenhuis collected his first big-league hit.)

The 2013 Mets [...]

The Wilbur Huckle Appreciation Society

The Mets didn’t lose! Coincidentally, they didn’t play — their game against the Nats was washed away by the advance guard of Tropical Storm Andrea, which will also wash away tomorrow night’s game here against the Marlins. We’ve been saying for some time that you should make other plans, but this time we really mean [...]

Little Mets Sunshine

Go figure. After somehow overcoming their own lack of hitting and boneheadedness afield to take two from the Yankees at Citi Field, the Mets made the very short trip north to resume hostilities in the Bronx with the likable but generally luckless Jeremy Hefner on the mound. So of course they leaped on David Phelps [...]

Why We Keep Watching

Even great baseball teams lose an annoying number of games.

The runaway-train teams — your ’86 Mets and ’98 Yankees and ’01 Mariners — are still going to lose 15 or 20 games that make you want to lie down in the road. Which means 45 to 60 hours of your time will be dedicated to [...]

The New New Breed

Before I became a father, one of my many reasons for not wanting to take that step was that I thought parenthood meant life would be static. You had a kid and disappeared, sitting at home waiting for your child to grow up into someone interesting. By the time that happened, you’d be fossilized and [...]

Call Me LaTroy

I’m the LaTroy Hawkins of Mets fandom.

At least I hope I am.

LaTroy Hawkins, 40 and a veteran pitcher, hasn’t pitched in a game yet and is not particularly concerned about that. He thinks spring training is too long, doesn’t seem too interested in the World Baseball Classic, and says he’ll be ready for the season.

Jason [...]

Can the Mets Get New York Back?

Hello, is this the York residence?

Is this Mr. York?

Good day, Mr. York. I’m with the Metropolitan Baseball Club, and I’m calling to discuss your fanship. Our records indicate you signed on with us as a charter supporter of ours in 1962, which you might remember entitled you to a full Mets fan identity for the [...]

In Need of a Distraction

In a few short days, pitchers and catchers, David Wright and any players wise enough to understand Terry Collins’ odd definition of “on time” will all have assembled in Port St. Lucie for spring training. Which will be nice — but not because it’s a sign of spring.

That doesn’t really work for me any more. [...]