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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Sometimes You See the Bullet

It’s not so much that if you watch enough baseball, you see something new every day. It’s that if you watch enough baseball, you see something you’ve seen some other day, thus allowing you to perhaps sense what’s coming directly at you.

On the surface, the Mets’ come-from-moribund victory over the Brewers Friday night came out [...]

We'll Always Have Papelbon

Jordany, we hardly knew ye. Actually, we knew ye surprisingly well for someone who played relatively little — though I guess for all the exhibitionist Instagrams and clubhouse clucking, we didn’t know everything relevant there was to know. Now we know for certain we won’t be seeing you in September at Citi Field…though we could’ve [...]

Not Quite a Business of Miracles

Stephanie and I spent Saturday with the Mets and with the Stems. The Mets are the Mets. The Stems are the opposite of the Mets, and they were embodied not by the victorious visiting Milwaukee Brewers but by two people who are the opposite of fans of the Mets.

Let’s call them Mr. and Mrs. Stem.

That [...]

TWO Closers? How Would THAT Work?

In a telephone conversation Wednesday afternoon, Roenicke said he intends to use both Axford and Rodriguez in save situations and both in setup situations.
–Adam McCalvy, mlb.com

John Axford was the closer for the Milwaukee Brewers. When the phone rang, he knew it was for him.

AXFORD: Hey, I got this.

But Francisco Rodriguez was one of the game’s most [...]

Omar, Is That You?

Funny, Frankie Rodriguez gets traded and I keep thinking about Omar Minaya.

And not entirely in a negative way, either.

In thinking about the confounding yet entertaining 2011 Mets, you can’t miss that a number of the team’s more encouraging success stories — Jonathon Niese, Daniel Murphy, R.A. Dickey, Dillon Gee, Justin Turner and Ruben Tejada — [...]

Frank You Very Much for Coming

“He slept, he stole, he was rude to the customers. Still, there goes the best damned employee a convenience store ever had.”
—Apu, on Homer, “Lisa’s Pony”

I doubt there’ll ever be much nostalgia for the Francisco Rodriguez era of New York Mets baseball, an epoch officially declared over in the minutes following the National League’s second [...]

Lovely Story Interrupted

It’s wonderful to be a Mets fan right now. It really is. While everybody tells jokes, the Mets have assembled a Quadruple-A lineup of guys who don’t do too much but do just enough, playing the game the right way, not shooting themselves in the foot and –

DICKEY! WOULD YOU NOT DO THAT? I KNOW [...]

Zzzz-Rod

The Mountain Time Zone and the mountainous rain delay combined to knock me out before the final pitch last night. Hung in there through Mets Yearbook: 1966 and Mets Yearbook: 1967 (which SNY cut away from just as Whitey Herzog was about to announce his intention to draft…what a cliffhanger!) and reveled, as Gary Cohen [...]

Pick Yourself Up, Dust Yourself Off

Josh Thole loomed as Mr. Metaphor Saturday night, falling down rounding first and getting his eager ass tagged out on a throw-behind from Emilio Bonifacio to Gaby Sanchez in the seventh, then picking himself up, dusting himself off and lining the go-ahead single in the ninth. Turned out, however, Thole’s destiny was to serve as [...]

Closing Time (Closers Optional)

You may recall that the one element Bobby Cox always lacked as he led the Braves through their almost endless divisional dynasty was a certifiable steel-toed, kick-ass closer. He was never able to hand the ball to a National League version of Mariano Rivera — not that there are too many of him lying around [...]