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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Fandom in the Shadows

Every baseball fan worth her salt knows it’s one of the fundamental rules of fandom: You extrapolate from Opening Day at your peril.

Collin Cowgill‘s grand slam on Opening Day 2013 didn’t kickstart a 162-0 season and a World Series title, or keep Cowgill in the major leagues until early May.

On Opening Day 1969 Tom Seaver [...]

This Is No Eighth-Place Ballclub

Leo Durocher would have relished this weekend in Las Vegas. The Cactus League Cubs — the team he managed to its only oasis of success in a nearly 40-year schlep through a desert of futility, and the Grapefruit Circuit Mets — the team that inevitably turned 1969 into a Near North Side mirage, will square [...]

Past, Present and Future

Past

Here’s a sign of spring: The 2014 Topps cards are out.

Let’s not go overboard: This isn’t the greatest set. The photography’s good again, but Topps has developed an unfortunate predilection for novelty shots, with far too many players romping with teammates (and often on dreaded horizontal cards), getting doused with Gatorade or showing off Oscar [...]

Everything's Coming Up Flores

I didn’t know much about Wilmer Flores before his promotion last week, primarily because I cultivate a state of plausible deniability where the Met minor leagues are concerned. I remain mostly blissfully ignorant about Met prospects because, quite frankly, I don’t want to know. With a handful of exceptions at the Harvey-Wheeler level, I figure [...]

Bounce in Our Step

Relax, all right? Don’t try to strike everybody out. Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they’re fascist. Throw some ground balls, it’s more democratic. — Bull Durham

The forecast was ominous: likely rain.

Yeah right.

The raindrops remained at a respectful distance, because they — like the rest of us — wanted to watch Matt [...]

Pennant Race Muscle Memory

Saturday was just mild disgust, the kind that’s been de rigueur in Metsopotamia since 2009. You know how it goes: our starting pitcher is taken early and often into distant seating sections, our lineup falls easy prey to his opposite number and it rains before it can end. The Mets indeed played one of their [...]

The Force Is With the Mets

First off, no, I wasn’t at Star Wars Night — to the shock of people belonging to two fanbases for which I am a rare Venn diagram overlap. Why not? I don’t really have a good reason beyond being busy and tired. Besides, I have the memory of being a stormtrooper for an evening at [...]

Little Mets Sunshine

Go figure. After somehow overcoming their own lack of hitting and boneheadedness afield to take two from the Yankees at Citi Field, the Mets made the very short trip north to resume hostilities in the Bronx with the likable but generally luckless Jeremy Hefner on the mound. So of course they leaped on David Phelps [...]

Why We Keep Watching

Even great baseball teams lose an annoying number of games.

The runaway-train teams — your ’86 Mets and ’98 Yankees and ’01 Mariners — are still going to lose 15 or 20 games that make you want to lie down in the road. Which means 45 to 60 hours of your time will be dedicated to [...]

The New New Breed

Before I became a father, one of my many reasons for not wanting to take that step was that I thought parenthood meant life would be static. You had a kid and disappeared, sitting at home waiting for your child to grow up into someone interesting. By the time that happened, you’d be fossilized and [...]