The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Slow and Easy

The Mets took two out of three from the Royals. Their unlikely wild-card march has them two games behind the Cubs for possession of the second N.L. spot — but they’ve drawn even with fellow contenders Philadelphia and Milwaukee.

That’s the upshot of a long weekend of baseball. Of course, that’s the straightforward solution to a […]

A Small Stuffed Bear Is Still, Technically, a Bear

Jason Vargas headed into winter in style Thursday night, allowing three hits and no runs over seven innings as the Mets beat the Braves. In fact, Mets starting pitchers allowed the Braves exactly zero runs in the two teams’ final series of the year.

Asterisk time! Vargas may have shaved nearly three runs off his ERA […]

Still Standing

I usually have a favorite player, but as a grown man how I acquire one has changed. It’s impossible, for instance, for me to make heroes out of young men who could quite literally be my own children. And I’ve learned too much else about the game and life to put anyone on a pedestal. […]

As If I Care

The upset of the season occurred Sunday afternoon as I was upset — mildly, but palpably (if not Papelbon) — that the brink-of-elimination Mets were defeated by the cusp-of-clinching Red Sox. The two teams may play in the same quadrant of the country, but they’ve hardly competed […]

The Road Goes Ever On

Your recapper will begin by confessing something usually kept discreetly behind the Faith & Fear curtain: his direct experience of tonight’s game was limited to the bottom of the ninth, watched while scowling/frowning at a phone in a friend’s living room north of Boston.

Well, fuck.

That bottom of the ninth was brief. Mercifully, one […]

Crazy, Stupid, Hope

I have the data to refute this, but every Mets game I’ve ever been to seems to have ended with the Mets trailing in the ninth, getting the tying and/or winning runs on base or at least to the plate, and losing anyway. The data says that’s […]

Here They Come Again

You know it, I know it, we all know it. Pitchers have reported to 525 NW Peacock Blvd. in beautiful Port St. Lucie, Fla. People equipped to catch them are there to meet them. Also in attendance: hopes, dreams, a sense of renewal and blessed repetition.

Every February I grow weary of Spring Training. It used […]

83-79 or Bust!

Hope is a self-healing thing.

The Mets have won four in a row. I’d say “somehow,” except they’ve been playing the Phillies and the Reds, two teams that (like the Mets) are quantitatively and officially lousy.

Still, they all count and during this modest but thoroughly welcome winning streak the Mets haven’t looked half-bad. Which is all […]

Bring Your Kids to See Our Kids

In the summer of 1977, with Tom Seaver exiled to Cincinnati, the Mets tried to lure fans back to Shea Stadium with the cheery come-on “bring your kids to see our kids.”

It didn’t work — nothing short of M. Donald Grant’s public execution would have worked under the circumstances — but this month I keep […]

Ready for the New Present

Can your blogger file his recap within the 24-hour window? Well, with an 11 am start he can. Why was the answer even close to know? Because this was the first game of the season I had no desire whatsoever to recap — which for me is usually a sign that I’ve finally accepted that the competitive part […]