The blog for Mets fans
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Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Deep Breaths

Wednesday night’s win over the Marlins was full of encouraging signs for the Mets, and left me feeling something I’ve rarely felt in a tight race’s last few days: a sense of calm.

Seth Lugo looked shaky early, struggling to command his pitches and reminding us that for all his meritorious service, he’s written an out-of-nowhere story that makes Jacob […]


My preparations for watching Friday night’s game included slippers and finding the fake fur throw that my wife was horrified when I bought — TV-watching components that made their last appearance one chilly day in May. It’s the baseball circle of life — a young season that needed spring thawing before we discovered what it […]

The Joys of House Money

The Mets are fun again.

Before we wax rhapsodic about that, let’s be honest in a eye-rolling, way-to-be-a-bringdown way: the Mets are mostly fun again because they’re winning, leading us to attach all sorts of significance to those wins.

But it’s not all fan rationalization. Tonight I found myself thinking something I thought last September, as the Mets […]

Last Met Standing?

Shortly after the Mets wrapped up their third straight win over the Marlins Wednesday night, I had an odd vision: Alejandro De Aza hits the home run that proves to be the difference in Game 7 of the 2016 World Series. He’s mobbed by 24 Mets, all of them emergency call-ups from the minors. Shortly […]

They Sang to Me This Song of Hope

With one swing, Jay Bruce saved and screwed us all Thursday night. The National League RBI leader — with three crucial Met runs batted in on top of eighty from Cincinnati that do us no good whatsoever — blasted a three-run homer over Yankee Stadium’s center field fence to ensure Bartolo Colon’s vintage pitching performance […]

Get Your Hopes Up

The Mets have played 38.3% of their allotted baseball games for 2016, which in and of itself is no magic number, but if you do the math and calculate that 38.3% of a pie has been consumed, you understand 61.7% of it remains. If you express 61.7% as a decimal figure, the kind you’d see […]

Draft-Day Double Vision

Out in Milwaukee, the Mets played a baseball game that was quietly unsettling for a good chunk of the evening: Curtis Granderson led off with a home run and the Mets kept piling up base runners against a wild, ineffective Jimmy Nelson, but — in recent Metsian fashion — the protagonists failed to deliver the […]

The Chance We Wanted

I no longer remember the exact circumstances, but years ago there was a newspaper story featuring a Yankee fan who didn’t understand why any franchise would adopt “Ya Gotta Believe” (or one of its non-spontaneous, corporate-approved descendants) as a rallying cry. Terrible slogan, she snorted dismissively: “Believe? That’s lame. We know.”

That always struck me as a perfect way to describe the two New York fanbases, because strip […]

The Cheers for Wilmer

There have been more exhausting 48-hour stretches in the life of a Mets fan — the desperate scramble at the end of the ’99 season comes to mind — but not for a very long time. And perhaps there’s never been such an insane rollercoaster of emotions over so few hours, with euphoria, anger, confusion, despair, and […]

Two Games Out With 75 to Play

The pitching’s too good to ever get too down. There’s not a Shaun Marcum reclamation project in the bunch, no Chris Capuano dutifully sucking up innings as if that’s the goal of any given game. One start you get Jacob deGrom, who opposing batters can’t hit; next game it’s Noah Syndergaard, who they can’t touch.

In […]