The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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One of a Kind (Runs Affair)

That creature you thought you saw rumbling across the landscape at Citi Field late Friday night…it wasn’t your imagination. It was that most elusive of baseball figures, the Unicorn Score.

The New York Mets posted what was for them an unprecedented final, beating the Colorado Rockies, 14-2. Thanks to Baseball Reference’s Play Index tool and my […]

Dumb Fun

That might have been the dumbest baseball game I’ve ever seen.

It wasn’t exactly what any of us expected from Jacob deGrom vs. Carlos Martinez, as neither ace’s location was what it needed to be. The result was basically an Adam West-Burt Ward Batman caper, with the principals milling around for a bit until it was […]

Baseball Like It Taut’a Be

Some games words filter into your brain. The word of the night Friday was “taut,” as in nice and tight, the way you’d figure someone who intermittently devotes himself to baseball as something of an academic discipline would like it. Give a student of the game a 2-1 affair won by his favorite team and […]

Deep Thoughts by Jacob deGrom

A pitcher homering is baseball porn, pure and simple. A pitcher pitching eight innings and giving up no earned runs is more exotic than it used to be, maybe more exotic than it oughta be. Which would you rather have?

You’d rather have both if you can, and we could on Sunday afternoon at Citi Field. […]

Everything Is Jake

Jacob deGrom was good. He was really good.

Not so long ago, this wouldn’t have been a surprising thing to write. But it’s been a surprising season, to put it mildly.

The key to deGrom’s successful night was that he reintroduced his change-up to complement his fastball. In the postgame debrief, DeGrom passed along analysis from Dan Warthen that […]

Millstone Endured

Hmm, is that how you spell Milestone Achieved? It looks a little funny, but there’s no wavy red line under it, so I guess it must be correct.

As you may have heard, Tuesday’s night game — played in whatever suburb of Dallas that’s considered to be in whatever that park that looks perfectly new but […]

Showing Up With Nothing

Pitching’s hard. You knew that. But dig into everything involved with pitching and you wind up amazed that anyone can do it at all.

Never mind, for a moment, the routine and chronic physical danger inherent in it — the stress and pain of doing something unnatural and damaging over and over again. And put aside the rare but […]

Fairy Tales Can Come True

“All right, time for bed.”
“Tell me a story!”
“You want a story, huh?”
“Yeah, but make it a good one this time.”
“What’s wrong with the stories I’ve been telling you?”
“They’re always so sad.”
“Not always.”
“Yes always. There’s always somebody getting hurt and somebody going on a list where they stay hurt and everybody winding up sad in the […]

They Did Win

The story is possibly apocryphal, but it’s worth retelling. On a Friday night in 2017, the phone rang in the office of a New York-area baseball blog. The caller had a question: “How many runs did the Mets give up today?” The person working the desk reported, “None.” The caller had a followup:

“Did they win?”

Yes, […]

Blown

The question was posed by a classmate in AP History in twelfth grade: how did the United States did lose China? Our teacher, an affable sort named Mr. Friend, answered that the United States did not lose China, for China was never the United States’s to begin with. I’ve tried to remember that Friendly analysis […]