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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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“Daddy,” Tatum Niese might one day ask his father, “can you tell me about the night I was born?”

“No,” would be the appropriate reply from the pitcher who had no answers for the Dodger lineup Friday but at least he had an excuse — the birth of the actual kid in this hypothetical conversation.

Far be […]

What’s Their Line?

Perhaps you’ve heard the story of John Daly, host of CBS’s What’s My Line?, introducing his broadcast of Sunday night, May 31, 1964, with the honest admission that he’d been backstage watching the most “marvelous” — or in one retelling “fantastic” — baseball game between the New York Mets and San Francisco Giants just before […]

Once in a Blue Monell

In another century, you could easily discern the difference between frontline and rear-echelon Mets. The starters were the starters and the bench guys were held in reserve until needed. When one of the bench guys got in the lineup, it usually meant a regular was aching or slumping or simply needed a blow. It was […]

Bats Minus Matz? Rats!

Let’s hear more about Steven Matz. Let’s see more of his delighted grandpa. Let’s get another look at his delightful sandwich. Let’s relive those three hits from Sunday, which is as many as Steven Matz’s teammates collected without his help Tuesday. Let us tally up his four runs batted in, roughly four more than Mets […]

One Skid Ends, Another Goes On

I was wrong to have expected the 11:02 from Jamaica to have left Jamaica at 11:02, so my last call of Thursday night was off (forty sweltering, cranky minutes of waiting later, I realized there’s a reason the LIRR never touts the train from the game). Otherwise, though, I had a pretty good run of […]

No Towel To Throw In

Welcome to FAFIF Turns Ten, a not completely forgotten milestone-anniversary series in which we consider anew some of the topics that defined Mets baseball during our first decade of blogging. In this ninth of ten installments, we go to the only ballpark we’ve got.

Citi Field and I have had a strained relationship these past seven […]

Niese On Ultimate

Many of you will probably tire of seeing it before long, but for those of you not in the New York market, we’ve obtained the script for the “Niese On Nissan” commercial that will be airing incessantly during Mets games for the next several months. The ad was shot late Saturday night outside Citizens Bank […]

I’ve Got Pieces of April

If you’re a sports fan, the best Aprils are the most stressful Aprils. In competitive context, such Aprils are the least cruellest of months, but they can play on your nerves.

The two teams I root for in winter, the Nets and the Islanders, have made it to spring’s playoffs. It beats their having to go […]

A Mental Game

Baseball’s a mental game. Perhaps you’ve heard.

For a maddening, frustrating game this one was actually kind of fun. Wait, hear me out on that.

The Mets lost because multiple members of the team made physical errors, followed by multiple members of the team making mental errors. Those weren’t the fun parts.

But these parts were pretty neat:

back-to-back home […]

A Sense of Occasion

I’ve been a baseball fan a very long time, but once a year, depending on the circumstances, I’m talked to like I’ve just discovered the game.

Ironically, it didn’t happen when I was relatively new to baseball. When I was a kid, the issue at hand was helpfully childlike in its simplicity. It went something like […]