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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Cespy-YES

OK, that was fun.

If Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman represented Plan F and G, or some letter fairly far along in the stack, what letter was reserved for Rafael Montero?

Montero hadn’t started a game since last April and had done nothing since then to make any member of the Mets brass think well of him. He spent […]

Turning Points Can Be Easy to Miss

Bartolo Colon going for the cycle! Leaping grabs from Jose Reyes! Bullets fired by Yoenis Cespedes! Asdrubal Cabrera going deep from both sides of the plate — and making a nifty play to short-circuit the Phillies!

And of course Wilmer Flores sending one into the Flushing night to make a tense ballgame so much more relaxed.

That was […]

Team of Destiny To Be Determined

When Jim Henderson entered Tuesday night’s game at St. Louis — one on, one out, Yadier Molina coming up, Mets leading by two in the seventh — it occurred to me that this was potentially a pivotal moment in Henderson’s Met legacy. If Henderson surrendered a two-run homer to Molina, which wasn’t out of the […]

No Longer Weird

On July 23, 2005, Jose Reyes busted out at Shea. The kid we’d been told was gonna do great things did the greatest things he’d done to date: 4-for-5, including a triple; two RBIs; two steals; three runs scored. The Mets beat the Dodgers, 7-5. Mets starting pitcher Pedro Martinez — almost exactly a decade […]

The Game That Wouldn’t Get Away

Sometimes you look at the screen and you know you’re doomed. Then you look at the tiny score bug in the corner of the screen and realize you’re not. You’re losing in all facets of the game, especially on the scoreboard, but it hits you after a while that the game is neither over nor […]

The Breaks

You probably didn’t need this reminder, but here it is anyway: baseball will make you look dumb.

Like maybe in the afterglow of Thursday night’s thrilling comeback against the Nats (deliciously complete with hirsute heel Jayson Werth shooting his own team in the collective foot) you found yourself thinking that it was really too bad the Mets […]

Fish-Fry Matinee

Was Wednesday afternoon’s matinee a perfect baseball game?

Probably not — if you have to ask you have your own answer — but it was sure an enjoyable one, with a spectacular performance from Jacob deGrom, signs of professional life from Jose Reyes, a terrific day from Wilmer Flores, and a heckuva dragon to slay in a […]

The Strangest Dream

I came home from Closing Day today, still a little miffed that Jose Reyes pulled himself from the game the second he got to first. I didn’t mind the protecting of his .337 average. But he couldn’t have stayed on the bag another minute? Who pinch-runs for Jose Reyes if he’s not injured?

Teddy Ballgame, it […]

Last Man Not Standing

Well now. The Mets, baseball’s worst second-place, currently-qualified-for-postseason-play team, won a game that was alternately exasperating, entertaining, frightening, amusing, and mostly befuddling.

If you missed it, Steven Matz cruised through four innings, facing the minimum and watching as the Mets put up an eight-spot against punching bag Aaron Blair. At which point everything — no really, everything — […]

Of Coming Through & Coming Back

You don’t want to have to win a game by using five relievers to cover 8.2 innings, but you surely don’t want to lose a game under those circumstances. They were unavoidable Wednesday night once Bartolo Colon was forced to leave in deference to a liner off his right thumb from Royals leadoff hitter Whit […]