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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Dunham Bull?

What constitutes a trend? For our purposes, let’s say it’s when two people you know relay to you, independent of one another, the same piece of information accompanied by a similar slice of curiosity.

In her upcoming memoir, Not That Kind Of Girl, the reliably trendy Lena Dunham says her gynecologist used to pitch for the [...]

Gee, 199?

Would it have disturbed some grand plan to have allowed Dillon Gee to pitch the seventh inning Thursday night? The man threw 193 innings entering his final start of the season after missing almost three months in 2012. He’s been our only starter to take the ball every turn of the rotation from the first [...]

Happy Is Better

After eight and a half innings, I had a little roadmap of tonight’s post scrawled on a bit of scratch paper:

Another chapter of Mets payroll football, starring Sandy Alderson as Charlie Brown
Criticism of/sympathy for Matt Harvey, with Qualcomm jokes
Tip of the cap to Gary Cohen, memories of his jubilant calls from 1999
Oh yeah, the game [...]

Ya Win Some, Ya Lose Ike

More than a few media outlets have let it be known they don’t plan to refer to Washington’s football team as “the Redskins” this fall. And in an unrelated development, it’s highly unlikely that the name “the Washington Nationals” will be mentioned in many baseball stories come October.

Let us enjoy this brief period of tangible [...]

Longer Than The Norm

So I went to Saturday’s Mets baseball game — it was 1973 Playing Cards Day, for gosh sake, the Wilponian equivalent of 52 tiny old-timers shuffling out of a plastic-coated, Caesars-branded pack for our brief nostalgic reverence — and a marathon broke out. Yup, another long one from those wonderful folks who brought you the [...]

Time Is On Our Side

The Mets no longer require extra innings. They make the regulation amount go on forever. In their first two games coming out of the All-Star break — one a hopeless blowout loss, the other a relatively mundane win — they donated more than seven hours to the baseball-starved denizens of Queens inside a span of [...]

Fireworks Night Can Blow Itself (Up)

Things that still suck, in case you thought there’d been a change:

• The Mets
• The MTA
• Cody Ross
• Fireworks Night

The Mets and their 5-3 loss in which Matt Harvey couldn’t rescue them and they couldn’t rescue Matt Harvey speaks for itself (and I believe the word it spoke was “feh”). Wednesday was yet another night [...]

Mets Stage Impromptu 1973 Tribute

You don’t gotta believe or anything crazy like that, but you gotta take stock of what’s been going on in the National League East since May 26:

New York 15-14
Miami 14-14
Atlanta 15-16
Washington 14-15
Philadelphia 14-17

If that’s not 1973 in miniature, I don’t know what is.

We bemoan the lack of a 40th anniversary tribute from the organization that [...]

Live from Philadelphia, It's David Wright!

I took a fantastic pregame nap Saturday afternoon. It was fantastic because I awoke to the sound of David Wright playing, David Wright batting and David Wright going way deeper than I’d been sleeping.

No, Howie and Josh assured me, I wasn’t dreaming. David was not on the DL, despite what everybody and his Twitter account [...]

Seven-Run Swing to Nowhere

It’s not our pennant race, but we were about to make a potentially legendary impact on it. That would’ve been fun.

In the bottom of the second, already behind by two, Chris Schwinden couldn’t have appeared much more in danger. Infield hijinks, bloop warfare and the temptation of hitting Rafael Furcal that was just too good [...]