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Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Rambling On After San Diego

Dillon Gee didn’t look so hot, but neither did Craig Kimbrel, and Craig Kimbrel is a big deal. Plus Kimbrel only pitches ninth innings, usually. Gee pitches firsts, seconds, maybe a couple more…

Usually Gee pitches fifths and then some. Usually he’s in a five-man rotation. Usuallys are hard to gauge some nights.

Kimbrel, I hear, hasn’t […]

Day in the Sun

It’s an odd feeling when you’re away from your team and they’re doing poorly. You’re a bit relieved, because in your normal life you’d have flushed three hours down the drain but instead you get the bad news via a glance at a phone, paper or distant TV and then get on with whatever it […]

Mets Being Mets & Sometimes Not

What are the Mets historically on the field of play if not outstanding pitching, reliable defense and frustrating offense whose capability for power and speed emerges mostly in sporadic fashion? This is their personality profile through the years. Some seasons the composition varies, but this is what one has been conditioned to expect if things […]

The Big Hang With 'Em

Hang with ’em.

It was one of the first bits of baseball advice I gave Joshua to pass along to the little figures on the TV who can’t hear us. Blasted a ball up the gap that the right fielder barely speared at a dead run? Hang with ’em. Laser beam perfectly intersected by the apex of […]

Try These On For Size

Thanks for coming along. I know you hate when I drag you shopping, especially when there’s been so much riveting local sports on TV, but with all I needed to pick up for my Saturday night paragraph, I needed somebody’s opinion on how it all goes together.

I’m gonna try all these facts on for size. […]

The One That Didn’t Get Away

In most parallel universes, the Mets lost Thursday night. They had to.

They were playing the Marlins.

Giancarlo Stanton went traditionally deep.

They were playing the Marlins.

Martin Prado added his own four cents.

They were playing the Marlins.

Dillon Gee pitched gamefully but not quite well enough to fully extricate himself from his last tangle of trouble.

They were playing the […]

Valor 2.0

The Mets playing a relatively ho-hum game wasn’t the worst thing in the world, after the emotion and intensity and wall-to-wall zaniness of whatever that was last night. Of course, a ho-hum game is a satisfying thing provided you win. Which the Mets did rather handily.

Some quick takes and then we’ll get on to the […]

The New Old Normal

I’m getting old. It happens to everybody, to their astonishment. I’ll be 46 in a month — which isn’t ancient if you’re 56 or 66 or north of there but unfathomable at 16 or 26.

A funny thing about age, as I lean into it: Your frame of reference for time changes so thoroughly that you […]

Jerry's Kids Grow Up

Welcome to FAFIF Turns Ten, a milestone-anniversary series in which we consider anew some of the topics that have defined Mets baseball during our first decade of blogging. In this installment, we notice how Met turnover subtly became Met stability.

There was an article in the Washington Post the other day that fascinated me. It informed […]

Lucas Duda Flaps His Wings

Few are the long-running sitcoms that haven’t trotted out the trope in which Thanksgiving (or perhaps some other festive gathering, but usually Thanksgiving) is imperiled because there are too many guests and not enough seats at the table or, for that matter, not enough food for all the guests squeezing their way to the table.

The […]