The blog for Mets fans
who like to read


Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Lightning Strikes Twice

Back in June, Emily and I decided that a lovely summer night would be made even better by our attending a ballgame. So we did … and watched the Mets get no-hit by Chris Heston and the San Francisco Giants.

I grumbled and groaned for competitive and aesthetic reasons. The competitive reasons for not wanting my […]

At Least Howie Rose to the Occasion

I’ll admit it. I was rooting for it.

I was out on Seventh Avenue in front of Penn Station using the time before the 9:39 Babylon train was announced to hear Howie Rose call history in the making. It was too absorbing a broadcast to let go to waste on a late two-out single that would […]

History, Even If You Ignore It

It seemed like a good idea. With our kid headed off to California with grandparents, I asked Emily if she wanted to go to the Mets game. Noah Syndergaard was pitching, and tickets were 66% off. She thought it was a capital idea. We snagged two seats in the front row of the Left Field landing, […]

The Pursuit of Perfection

You know things are strange when Greg Prince violates a baseball taboo.

The email arrived about midway through Bartolo Colon‘s attempt at retiring 27 straight Seattle Mariners, with the subject line HERESY. “I’m not feeling more than minimally emotionally invested in Bartolo Colon’s particular effort today,” Greg wrote to me.

He didn’t spell out what that effort was, […]

Johan, on the Mound, with the Change-up

The poor Orioles are getting killed at Citi Field, and they don’t have a clue.

Yesterday it was R.A. Dickey, armed with a knuckleball that was for all intents and purposes unhittable, one he used to write the latest chapter of his remarkable story. Greg chronicled R.A.’s second straight one-hitter here yesterday; today Roger Angell — our […]

What Johan Did, in Perspective

no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no […]

There Go the 8,002 No-Hitters

That darn Giancarlo Stanton really did it to us Sunday. What a bastard.

The walkoff grand slam that added a fashionable dent to the fishy Home Run Sculpture? No, not that (though that sucked, too). I’m talking about Stanton’s first hit, the single to center that opened the bottom of the second, which was the Marlins’ […]

The Original Craig Anderson

If you’re a Mets fan who likes to read, read George Vecsey recounting his recent visit with 1962-1964 Met pitcher Craig Anderson, who finished his career on an 18-game losing streak but not before he crammed two wins into one day, fifty years ago tomorrow. For a man whose name became statistically synonymous with “loss,” […]

Madness, Collective and Otherwise

As I was heading down to tuck the kid into bed, Jose Altuve hit a little squibber in front of the plate, a play that ended with me looking back from the stairs to see Josh Thole and R.A. Dickey standing in annoyed proximity and Altuve far away on first.

Another day without a no-hitter, I […]

1.000 Times Yes

The Mets may not be flawless, but so far this year they are perfect.

They’re undefeated through their first series, alone in first place in their division, alone in New York on the list of teams that have won at least one baseball game that counts this year.

That’s as close to flawless as they need to […]