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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Time Continues After Opening Day

The second chapter of the perfect season completed itself Saturday, confirming that every good vibe we felt on Thursday was accurate. The Mets are 2-0 afterbeating St. Louis at Citi Field, 6-2. Clearly, they’ve gotten the hang of baseball and need only repeat everything they’ve done 81 […]

Steps Along the Road

So. I pretty much took the winter off.

I was busy with my other dorky obsession, writing books related to this oddball space-fantasy movie you might have heard of. But that’s an excuse. I was weirdly disengaged — to an extent that began to worry me.

Granted, my disengaged would be a lot of folks’ full-throated fandom. […]

And Now, the Start is Near

Pitchers and catchers reported to Mets camp on February 12. Position players, if they weren’t already on hand, checked in on February 17. The first full-squad workout under the auspices of new manager Mickey Callaway was February 19. Exhibition games began on February 23.

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Mets Versus St. Louis

While you’re waiting for 2018 to commence in earnest, or should you find yourself jonesing for compelling content amid the plethora of upcoming off days (why have off days when we just had an offseason?), I suggest treating yourself to some quality streaming, courtesy of Nine Network […]

An Invitation Best Refused

It wasn’t exactly on my bucket list — unless you’re redefining the term to mean “stuff that makes me want to puke when I think about enduring it” — but I can now say I’ve been through an Opening Day that I was dreading.

Dreading Opening Day? What a bizarre thing for a lifelong fan to say. […]

They Start Seasons, Don’t They?

Spring what now? Spring Training? Never heard of it. If, in fact, it existed, it has completely ceased to matter. The Mets, I seem to vaguely recall, introduced the phrase “winless streak” to the baseball vocabulary for a couple of weeks at the end of March, but March has ended. Games that don’t matter don’t […]

The New Old Normal

I’m getting old. It happens to everybody, to their astonishment. I’ll be 46 in a month — which isn’t ancient if you’re 56 or 66 or north of there but unfathomable at 16 or 26.

A funny thing about age, as I lean into it: Your frame of reference for time changes so thoroughly that you […]

Wrighthood

Welcome to FAFIF Turns Ten, a milestone-anniversary series in which we consider anew some of the topics that defined Mets baseball during our first decade of blogging. In this seventh of ten installments, we consider the one player who was there on our first Opening Day and who’s still here on our eleventh…and use the […]

Time Passages

I’ll let you in on a little secret about the endless period between baseball seasons:

It does end.

Who knew?

I’m not sorry to see the stretch that commenced with the last out of the last Met season and concludes with the first pitch of the new Met season expire, though since I’ve been doing this stuff here, […]

A Sense of Occasion

I’ve been a baseball fan a very long time, but once a year, depending on the circumstances, I’m talked to like I’ve just discovered the game.

Ironically, it didn’t happen when I was relatively new to baseball. When I was a kid, the issue at hand was helpfully childlike in its simplicity. It went something like […]