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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Giant Embrace

My regular team is nowhere to be found this October. I don’t have a temporary team at the moment. Some years I enter the playoffs with a cause. This year I’m just happy to be here as an unaligned onlooker. Some team will reveal itself to me as situationally mine soon enough.

Wednesday night, however, I [...]

The Stars Are Ours This Week

Perhaps I need to be more cynical, but I’m genuinely excited that All-Star Week is upon us and around us. Is it called All-Star Week? I can’t believe it’s not. I assume it’s trademarked and MLB is cashing in on it.

MLB will be cashing in off me in two scoops when I visit FanFest twice. [...]

Different Phases of Rebuilding

As Mets fans, we hope our tentatively planned deluxe apartment in the National League East sky will be ready for occupancy in a couple of years. As New Yorkers who made it through Superstorm Sandy, we understand projecting living arrangements can become a precarious matter when nature intrudes in the rudest fashion possible. Almost six [...]

Saturdays With Willie Mays

This past Saturday, I sat in the same room as Willie Mays and listened to him reminisce about Leo Durocher and Laraine Day and find a reason to invoke Mel Ott. Bobby Thomson’s name was mentioned prominently by others on hand. Carl Hubbell and Christy Mathewson were namechecked, too.

As Saturdays go, this was a good [...]

Chris Cannizzaro, Lingering Uptown

What’s wrong with this picture? Let’s instead go with what’s right about it.

This card was brought to my attention a couple of months ago and I can’t get it out of my head. It’s a veritable diner placemat that urges you to find all the things that are wrong with it while you tear [...]

Why I'd Own a Team

Before the latest round of Wilpon news erupted, I had been thinking about owning a baseball team. I don’t mean that in the “I had some spare zillions lying around and was looking to buy one,” but rather why people (very rich people) would do it. Usually owners come to the fore when there’s bad [...]

A Lifetime and the Aftermath

It’s a Sunday afternoon in September 1996. I’m at Shea Stadium with my best friend Chuck, diehard Met sympathizer, but better described as a bandwagon rider in terms of his actual Met fandom. Yet in September 1996, there is no bandwagon. There’s just me guilting him into joining me for a game against the Braves. [...]

Vic Ziegel: Great Writer, Great Fan

One of the great New York sports columnists, Vic Ziegel, has passed away at age 72 from lung cancer. You can and should read about his life and career here. He covered the early Mets as a beat writer with the Post and once told me there was no greater group of guys he came [...]

Move Over Daniel (Here Comes David)

Jonathon Niese endured. Ike Davis awoke. David Wright served the main course to one lucky Acela Club patron. The Florida Marlins learned that no one — and I mean no one —  comes into our house and pushes us around (hubris not applicable on final days of seasons). And while all this was going on, [...]

Say Hey, A Heart in New York

Say — or should I say hey — you know who was a really good baseball player? Willie Mays.

You probably knew that already, but you’ll really know it if you read Willie Mays: The Life, The Legend by James Hirsch. You’ll know a ton by the time you float through its 560 pages of text. [...]