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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Pitching With Mister P

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

In the mid-80s, while I was off at boarding school, I got a letter from my mother. That wasn’t odd, but what was inside was. My mother had sent me a folded-up article […]

Objects in Rearview Mirror Are Farther Than They Appear

The Mets followed two unlikely good nights in which they got lousy, abbreviated starts but hit and relieved their way out of the mess with a thoroughly bad one: no hitting, no relief, and no help on the scoreboard. None of which is ever good, all of which is really bad when the season’s down […]

My Last Favorite Player

It was a rally or as close to a rally as the 2018 Mets could have conjured in the first week of June 2018. Wednesday afternoon against the Orioles, Todd Frazier singled to lead off the bottom of the ninth. Recently returned from a hamstring injury and […]

Toss It On the Pile With the Rest of Them

World War II ended in 1945, yet there were handfuls of particularly stubborn Japanese soldiers in far-flung outposts who hadn’t gotten word or refused to believe what they were told about their nation’s surrender. One, Hiroo Onoda, was found to still be fighting a war that was no longer in progress as late as 1974.

And […]

The Closer & The Continuer

“The Mets — ah, the Mets! Superlatives do not quite fit them, but now, just as in 1969, the name alone is enough to bring back that rare inner smile that so many of us wore as the summer ended. The memory of what these Mets were in mid-season and the knowledge of what they […]

A Voice Like Few Others

The Village Voice recently and wisely named Alex Belth of Bronx Banter New York’s best sportswriter, and it’s a pleasure to present compelling evidence: “Two Rogers,” Alex’s exploration of the intersection of Roger Kahn and Roger Angell by way of Alex’s father, Don Belth. They’re three fascinating figures, as considered by someone who knows how […]

The Offseason We Spent Watching Baseball

It hasn’t been the greatest offseason for following Mets’ news in our family — Joshua’s REYES jersey is gone, though I can’t bear to dismantle the diptych of Reyes and Wright above his bed — but the beat does go on. This winter, Joshua and I (often with Emily alongside) watched all of Ken Burns’s […]

The Intersection of Cashen & Strawberry

In the spring of 1980, the New Yorker’s Roger Angell was making his incomparable annual rounds and alighted on St. Petersburg for a morning B-squad game between  Joe Torre’s Mets and their neighbors, Ken Boyer’s Cardinals. The rookie getting everybody’s attention that March was St. Louis’s big first baseman Leon Durham — “he is called […]

My Giants

If you can trace your roots without paying a genealogist, then it must be Flashback Friday at Faith and Fear in Flushing.

On April 18, 1957, New York’s National League franchise opened its home schedule just as it had done every year since 1883, just as it would never do again.

Fifty years and two days […]

Angellic

If you haven’t already, by all means get yourself a copy of the Nov. 27 New Yorker, and read the Roger Angell season recap.

I’ve loved Roger Angell as long as I’ve loved baseball — I remember reading The Summer Game as fast as a young boy could read a pretty thick book and realizing to […]