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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Open Wide, This Won't Hurt a Bit

After more than a year-and-a-half in dental denial that those random pains in my mouth were nothing that couldn’t be artfully ignored, I submitted to inevitable oral surgery this past Tuesday. Though I wouldn’t recommend it for a lark, I put myself in the hands of capable, caring professionals who made it nothing like the [...]

Little Mets Sunshine

Go figure. After somehow overcoming their own lack of hitting and boneheadedness afield to take two from the Yankees at Citi Field, the Mets made the very short trip north to resume hostilities in the Bronx with the likable but generally luckless Jeremy Hefner on the mound. So of course they leaped on David Phelps [...]

Lightning Strikes Again

When it comes to last-inning lightning striking where you traditionally don’t want to be standing during a regular-season Subway Series — under a tree in the middle of the Mets bullpen — I can remember the Yankees taking it to John Franco in 1997, Armando Benitez in 2002 and 2003, Braden Looper in 2005, Billy [...]

The Little Team That Didn't

The fine print on doggedly determined underdog teams that rise up and take a bite out of dismissive expectations is they’re prone to getting rapped on the nose by those wielding rolled-up newspapers…or booming bats.

This was a lousy weekend to be the Little Team That Could once it became apparent they Couldn’t. This was a [...]

Walking The Talk But Only One Yankee

To dig up a phrase a very mellow college buddy of mine liked to roll out six or seven times per conversation, Frank Francisco is a trip. I don’t think I’ve thought that about any of our modern-era closers. All my thoughts on our modern-era closers were laced with expletives rarely deleted.

Not that I don’t [...]

Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down

“Losing to the Yankees is no different than losing to Colorado. What stings is losing to the Marlins. They’re in our division.”
—Mets first baseman Ike Davis, June 21, 2012

“I can’t wait to strike out those chickens. I want to strike out the side against them. I’ve done it before.”
—Mets closer Frank Francisco, June 22, 2012

“What [...]

If You Care, Proceed With Caution

And this was before the Subway Series.

Movies are almost always better when there’s a Mets element to them, whether it’s outsized, as in the key 1969 scenes from the current release Men In Black 3, or subtle, as in 1987′s Moonstruck, which had nothing explicit to do with the Mets back in the day [...]

Zombie Apocalypse

We want the Mets to get up now…

“I just kind of felt dead tonight,” said Dillon Gee after losing to the Yankees, 4-2.

Didn’t we all inside? Didn’t everybody in a Mets uniform, with the possible exception of provisional savior Omar Quintanilla, look like Dillon felt?

Enough playing dead. Rise from the dead already.

It’s Sunday. It’s as [...]

Terry Collins and Kid Gloves

As one who wasn’t keeping up on the Astros’ day-to-day machinations from 1994 to 1996 nor the Angel melodramas of 1997 to 1999, I have to admit I knew little about Terry Collins during his first two tenures as a major league manager, other than he looked kind of miserable in Houston and it ended [...]

More Mlicki, Less Castillo

Just a reminder to the Mets: Increasingly, we fans say we don’t particularly care about the Subway Series, that the novelty wore off long ago, that six games a year is too many, that Interleague’s an unnecessary disruption to baseball’s beautifully synchronized rhythms and that the whole thing is played out. These statements may accurately [...]