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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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The Man Who Loved the Game

I knew Monday night’s game against the Marlins would be emotionally wrenching. I think we all did.

But I wasn’t prepared for just how tough it would be, and how tough it kept being.

There was the sight of every Marlin wearing Jose Fernandez‘s No. 16, and the knowledge that it would never be worn again.

There was […]

As Cruel as It Gets

I need to find a hobby that’s better for my health than watching the New York Mets.

I’m thinking maybe Russian roulette.

A long time ago, when I was still innocent and believed there was good in the world, it was a beautiful night for a ballgame. I was sitting in the stands with my wife, enjoying a crystal-clear […]

Nothing vs. Something

Terry Collins could have removed Rafael Montero at several junctures of his outing against the Washington Nationals Monday night, which speaks to what seems to be Terry’s managing philosophy: a preference to do nothing versus an inclination to do something. Montero wasn’t in the game very long by conventional measures (though it felt like hours). When […]

The Important Thing is Terry Could Relax

Had Steven Matz carried his Sunday no-hitter attempt at Citi Field two outs further and into the ninth inning, it would have been fascinating to have seen how Terry Collins would have balanced the not necessarily meshing interests of history (or HI32ORY) and preservation…preservation of Matz’s bone-spurred left elbow. But since Matz gave up his first hit, […]

New Though Not Yet Improved

On Saturday, before I slipped into my beloved PIAZZA 31 in order to pay tribute to our beloved Piazza’s 31, I dressed as a mild-mannered reporter at Citi Field. It doesn’t take much to dress like a mild-mannered reporter at Citi Field. You just wear what you’d wear to go out and get the mail, […]

The Meaningful Exhibition Game

Do you remember R.A. Dickey shutting down the Mets last June in Toronto and then letting it be known he was pitching a couple of days after his father’s death? Taking the ball was something his manager, John Gibbons, said he felt he had to do. That stayed with me in light of my father […]

Fish-Fry Matinee

Was Wednesday afternoon’s matinee a perfect baseball game?

Probably not — if you have to ask you have your own answer — but it was sure an enjoyable one, with a spectacular performance from Jacob deGrom, signs of professional life from Jose Reyes, a terrific day from Wilmer Flores, and a heckuva dragon to slay in a […]

Bystanders

It happens sometimes: life, that amorphous bundle of stuff, refuses to conform itself to the rhythms of 7:10 and 1:10 and 4:10. I thought I had my July 4th parceled out so three hours were reserved for the Mets game, but I hadn’t been paying attention to which day was which.

I’ve got a mental list of […]

Forest and the Trees

When the 2016 Mets trudged home to Citi Field earlier this week, it sure looked like they’d ceded the divisional race on June 29, dragged down by injuries, bad luck, lack of clutchness and Daniel Murphy, to name but a few maladies.

Later today, somehow, they’ll trust a four-game sweep of the big bad Chicago Cubs […]

Get Your Hopes Up

The Mets have played 38.3% of their allotted baseball games for 2016, which in and of itself is no magic number, but if you do the math and calculate that 38.3% of a pie has been consumed, you understand 61.7% of it remains. If you express 61.7% as a decimal figure, the kind you’d see […]