The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com. (Sorry, but we have no interest in ads, sponsored content or guest posts.)

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

The Seaver Standard

Bergino Baseball Clubhouse proprietor Jay Goldberg possesses the wryest of wits. In graciously inviting me to pull up a chair and talk about Piazza: Catcher, Slugger, Icon, Star at his one-of-a-kind shop a few blocks south of Union Square, he offered me the date of June 15. We would discuss my new book, of course, […]

QBC’s Nice To Come Home To

The sample size is only four Saturdays, but I can definitively report that it’s always colder the morning of the Queens Baseball Convention than it was at any point in the preceding week. Sometimes it snows. Sometimes it snows a lot. It snowed so much in 2016 that there was no QBC.

That’ll happen in January. […]

Marching to Astoria

Come to Astoria this Saturday for a Terrific time. The Queens Baseball Convention will be there, at Katch Astoria, 31-19 Newtown Avenue, and I’ll be there, talking up Tom Seaver at 5 PM. I’m moderating a panel commemorating and celebrating the 50th anniversary of Tom’s major league debut and his legacy as the greatest Met […]

Seaver and the Hendersons

Tom Seaver returned from M. Donald Exile (a.k.a. Cincinnati) on April 5, 1983, and though it was as if order had been restored to Shea Stadium, one element of the Metsian universe had been disturbed. The home uniform Tom donned for his triumphant restoration as king of our hill had been notably altered. The emperor’s […]

Sandlot Stars, Medical Degrees and Other Winter Tales

I’ve spent a good chunk of the winter sulking about Jeurys Familia quick-pitching or Yoenis Cespedes playing base-soccer or Daniel Murphy bringing the glove up or Cespedes charging off first on a soft liner or Terry Collins being too sentimental or Lucas Duda being unable to make a simple throw home or getting to the big stage […]

Meaning and Games in September

I can’t take me anywhere. I can, but I can’t depend on me to respond as social norms suggest I should.

I took myself to Citi Field Tuesday night at the invitation of a friend. The ostensible lure was the manifestation of that old Wilponian chestnut, Meaningful Games In September, MGIS for short (mishegas for our […]

That’s All There Is

And then I fell in love
With the most wonderful boy in the world
We would take long walks by the river
Or just sit for hours
Gazing into each other’s eyes
We were so very much in love

Then one day
He went away
And I thought I’d die
But I didn’t

And when I didn’t
I said to myself
“Is that […]

Noah's a Hit

I first laid eyes on Noah Syndergaard in July 2013, when he pitched for the USA in the All-Star Futures Game at Citi Field. (His opponent: Rafael Montero.) The Futures Game was lightly attended, and I wound up sitting with my pal Will in the luxe seats, the ones with padding where people will bring […]

A Sense of Occasion

I’ve been a baseball fan a very long time, but once a year, depending on the circumstances, I’m talked to like I’ve just discovered the game.

Ironically, it didn’t happen when I was relatively new to baseball. When I was a kid, the issue at hand was helpfully childlike in its simplicity. It went something like […]

Seaver At Seventy

He was born.
He matured.
He picked up a baseball.
He threw it.
He was about to be as good at it as anyone who has ever lived.

He joined a baseball team that had been as bad at its profession as any group that works with baseballs had ever been.
He made them better.
Everyone in his midst matured.
All of them […]