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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Say Hey! Get a Cup!

Willie Mays is celebrating his 80th birthday today.

The Mets are having another Collector’s Cup Night tonight.

Willie Mays began his Hall of Fame career at the age of 20 with the New York Giants, baseball ancestors of the New York Mets.

The cup is orange.

Willie Mays hit his first home run 60 years ago this month off [...]

The Happiest Recap: 022-024

Welcome to The Happiest Recap, a solid gold slate of New York Mets games culled from every schedule the Mets have ever played en route to this, their fiftieth year in baseball. We’ve created a dream season consisting of the “best” 22nd game in any Mets season, the “best” 23rd game in any Mets season, [...]

What's the Story, Jerrys?

This cold February day requires a box score to keep us warm. Thus, I shall toss upon the fire the box score from the first game of a twinight doubleheader at Shea Stadium, September 22, 1967, courtesy of Baseball Reference. It describes an 8-0 loss by the Mets to the Houston Astros, but I won’t [...]

Why I'd Own a Team

Before the latest round of Wilpon news erupted, I had been thinking about owning a baseball team. I don’t mean that in the “I had some spare zillions lying around and was looking to buy one,” but rather why people (very rich people) would do it. Usually owners come to the fore when there’s bad [...]

Whose Franchise Is It Anyway?

Our all-time favorite American League team since the other night, the Texas Rangers, will be making its first League Championship Series appearance in its 39 years of existence.

Just wanted to get that on the record — and let the second edition of the Washington Senators off the hook.

(Oh, the things one thinks about when one’s [...]

Say Hey, A Heart in New York

Say — or should I say hey — you know who was a really good baseball player? Willie Mays.

You probably knew that already, but you’ll really know it if you read Willie Mays: The Life, The Legend by James Hirsch. You’ll know a ton by the time you float through its 560 pages of text. [...]

Incongruous...Remarkable...Mets

The Mets, it was established when they were established, represented the New Breed. Their fans were descended from a tradition of Giants and Dodgers, but they — we — were something else altogether. We were not the past. We were the present and, by implication, the future. We were the stuff of 1962 when 1962 [...]

There's a Feel in the Air

In Willie Mays: The Life, The Legend by James Hirsch (which I’m about 130 pages from finishing, which is too bad, because I don’t want it to end), Willie tells a pack of reporters inquiring about the Giants’ pennant chances during Spring Training of 1961, “There’s a feel in the air.” One of his confidantes [...]

The Suffocating Insecurities of Mike Francesa

Pity Mike Francesa. He’s a very insecure man. Today he interviewed James Hirsch, the author of the wonderful Willie Mays: The Life, The Legend, and turned the conversation as well as the remainder of his show into a referendum (with his vote the only one that counts) on Mickey Mantle being better or more clutch [...]

Argenis Reyes, Historic Winner

My 2010 plans weren’t inexorably altered when I learned the Dodgers signed Argenis Reyes to a minor league contract, but upon doing a bit of checking, I now realize we’ve lost someone whose penchant for instant winning was unprecedented. We’ve lost a Met who was able to say, longer than any other Met, that he [...]