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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Attention: The 7 Train is Running on the 4 Track

The lazy interpretation of a Mets win over the Yankees is that the Mets looked like the Yankees and vice-versa, ha-ha; you can almost hear it coming out of the generic local anchor throwing it to sports. Excuse me while I step outside and punch that narrative in the face.

Yet now that I’ve gone there, […]

Way To Go

On Saturday afternoon, July 17, 1976, I saw Lloyd Waner hit and Tom Seaver pitch. Same place, different games. Waner appeared in the Old Timers Game at sunny Shea Stadium. At 13, I considered it a hoot that someone from the dusty pages of baseball’s distant past stood in the box and swung the bat, […]

Hands at 10 and 2

It is one of baseball’s great curiosities that your sub-.500 team can leave its home park, whip a first-place opponent in its home park by a fairly uncommon score on a Tuesday and do the exact same thing four days later to another first-place opponent in its home park. This particular phenomenon may not quite […]

Let This Post Be Your Sherbet

Doubleheaders are funny beasts.

Lose the first game — as the Mets just did in the Bronx against some team from an arriviste beer league — and you simultaneously take solace in the fact that doubleheader sweeps are hard to pull off and are gripped with horror at the prospect of dropping two games in one […]

Win 82 for Zack

Zack Wheeler, in his fifth major league season of actually pitching as opposed to healing, has never pitched for a Mets team that finished with a winning record. The only two good seasons during his injury-interrupted tenure were the seasons he missed with Tommy John surgery and […]

We’re Rubber, Not Glue

What was it Philippé Wynne was advising all over the radio in the autumn of 1976? Hey y’all, prepare yourself for the rubber game…win. Was that the lyric? Ah, close enough for rhythm & blues. However they heard it sung, the Mets apparently took a 43-year-old clue from the Spinners’ featured […]

Pause and Effect

One of the benefits of going to a baseball game rather than watching it on television is there’s no seven-second delay. Everything that happens happens and, as the spirit of Walter Cronkite might suggest, you are there. But Tuesday night at Citi Field, which is where I […]

Metropolitan Research Calling

Hello, sir or madam, I am calling today from Metropolitan Research Inquiries, or MRI. Your name has been chosen at random from a database of fans of your baseball team to determine which ways you’d prefer your team to lose. Results will go into helping create potential […]

Party at Zack's House

Friday night’s game was an Earl Weaver special — the Mets scored eight times in the first, then slowly pulled away. It was one of those games you think you’d want every night, because who doesn’t like a laugher that reveals itself as such within the first half an hour? In reality, though, you wouldn’t. […]

The Night They Drove Chris Flexen Down

With the possible exception of Angel Hernandez, moral failings are undetectable after the fourteenth inning. They don’t call it “free baseball” only because conductors don’t come around to collect a step-up fare (though I can’t imagine Rob Manfred hasn’t contemplated implementing such a revenue-generating opportunity and labeling […]