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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Twisting and Turning With the Baseball Gods

When your team’s bad you spend a lot of time fuming about how it should be made good. This guy who’s failed too often needs to lose his job to this guy who hasn’t failed yet, any fool can see the lineup should be revamped so it works like this, etc.

I’m not generally one for […]

A Victory That Dare Not Speak Its Name

It’s a tenet of our blog that there are no moral victories in baseball — the loss column comes without asterisks, parentheses or stuff in superscript. Moral victories are losses.

Well, except when one of us declares that moral victories do too exist.

Maybe I was just in a good mood: Monday night’s game found me and […]

Just Enough Still Counts as Enough

Baseball — perhaps you’ve heard — is a game of contrasts.

Take Hunter Greene vs. Jose Quintana, the starters for Friday night’s game in chilly Cincinnati. Greene is young, enormous and all but dripping talent, in possession of a high-90s fastball he can throw past big-league hitters as well as an evil slider tailor-made for embarrassing […]

The Stuff of Legend

It had rained for forty consecutive nights. The Mets had lost their previous fifty games. They had been no-hit for sixty innings in a row. Their most storied slugger was so desperate to effect change that he swung at a pitch seventy feet below sea level.

With one crack of the bat, the earth shook (eventually) […]

Grading on the Curve

Years ago, after too many not-yet-spring days spent at Shea watching it rain, waiting in horrible lines for bad coffee or both, my wife instituted a rule: No ballpark visits before May. In recent years, as I’ve become older and grumpier and more fragile, I’ve made her rule my own. I hope Opening Day is […]

No Shirt, Sherlock

Just in time for Pitchers & Catchers, we have broken into the Top 20 portion of MY FAVORITE SEASONS, FROM LEAST FAVORITE TO MOST FAVORITE, 1969-PRESENT. The focus of this entry is neither a pitcher nor a catcher, but he does happen to be somebody who will be reporting to Port St. Lucie in the […]

You Can Almost Admire It

It wasn’t raining Tuesday night. The problem was one of tenses — not what was happening weather-wise but what had happened. It wasn’t raining, but it had rained. Considerably. Considerably as in “enough that they give the concentration of rain a proper name and track it over the ocean like it’s an invasion fleet.”

An amount […]

Fun With Doubles

Freddie Freeman having doubled 55 times in 2023 without networks breaking into prime time programming even once to issue bulletins on his chase of 60 — a two-base hit total not reached since the 1930s — has got me thinking doubles are baseball’s most underappreciated hit. Ralph Kiner said home run hitters drive Cadillacs. Tim […]

The Blame Game

A habit I’m trying to break as a baseball fan is the assigning of blame. If the Mets don’t win – even a stripped-down, playing-out-the-string version of the Mets – it can’t be that the other team won or something went wrong or an unlucky event occurred. No, it has to be someone’s fault.

For instance: […]

The Gods of Garbage Time

Who are these Mets, anyway?

Joey Lucchesi was terrific, Mark Vientos homered, Pete Alonso drove in three on a homerless night and — in the most astonishing development of all — Trevor Gott and Drew Smith were allowed to pitch and didn’t fall apart like cheap watches. There was a nifty flying slide home by Jeff […]