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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Adam & Yadi Will Always Know How to Survive

It hit me one March day, when they were apart, how long they’d been together. Yadier Molina was captaining Puerto Rico to the finals of the WBC. Adam Wainwright was working out his kinks against the Mets on the East Coast of Florida. Soon enough, they’d reunite, accomplished battery, same team, another year. Two baseball […]

Dumb Fun

That might have been the dumbest baseball game I’ve ever seen.

It wasn’t exactly what any of us expected from Jacob deGrom vs. Carlos Martinez, as neither ace’s location was what it needed to be. The result was basically an Adam West-Burt Ward Batman caper, with the principals milling around for a bit until it was […]

Philadelphia Freedom

The forces of good were temporarily foiled Thursday night in St. Louis by Yadier Molina and dunderheaded officiating. Like havoc wreaked by rain on the late-September schedule, hardy perennials are hard to avoid.

The Cardinals and Reds were locked in a 3-3 tie in the bottom of the ninth. The Cards had Matt Carpenter on first […]

Team of Destiny To Be Determined

When Jim Henderson entered Tuesday night’s game at St. Louis — one on, one out, Yadier Molina coming up, Mets leading by two in the seventh — it occurred to me that this was potentially a pivotal moment in Henderson’s Met legacy. If Henderson surrendered a two-run homer to Molina, which wasn’t out of the […]

My Missouri Adventure

I’ll admit this: I never thought Fred Wilpon’s line about meaningful games in September was so embarrassing. Granted, I would have revised the line to “meaningful games in the last week of September.” If you’re playing those, your team’s kept you scoreboard watching, hoping and dreaming almost until the end, which I’ll always sign up for. […]

How Fragile We Are

During yet another scintillating replay review Friday night, we learned Keith Hernandez spent part of his All-Star break pulling weeds. Not by himself, mind you. He was assisting Maggie, “the gal that oversees my property,” in getting the job done, which, as Gary Cohen pointed out, was “lovely” of him. It’s lovely, too, to know […]

Contemptible Familiarity

The last National League East team to advance in a postseason was the Philadelphia Phillies of 2010, who swept the Cincinnati Reds in the NLDS, the series that opened with Roy Halladay throwing a no-hitter. The Phillies seemed on track to make their third consecutive World Series, but would be stopped cold by the San […]

The Majesty of Something

It’s a big world with lots of people of it. Even our little part of it — in which people in the New York area cheer for a baseball team — is pretty big.

No, I wasn’t specific about the baseball team. For one night, I’m going to expand our circle to include Yankees fans. Only […]

Inevitable Is As Inevitable Does

When I think of the Cardinals winning yet another pennant, I think of the episode of The Simpsons in which Grandpa Abe tells Bart the story of the Flying Hellfish from World War II, which leads to the two of them tracking down valuable stolen paintings that could make them very rich. Ultimately, however, they […]

The Inevitable Cardinals

You knew the Cardinals would beat the Pirates, didn’t you? The Cardinals are the new inevitables of the National League. They may not win the World Series. They may not win the pennant. But they always stick around because they never really go away. They trump most of the good stories that orbit in their […]