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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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A Little Bit of Hamilton in My Life

It was the “Mambo No. 5” game. That’s one of the two ways I differentiate it from all the other games I’ve attended. In the seventh-inning stretch, they played “Mambo No. 5,” the very contemporary and very kitschy song Lou Bega was making famous late in the summer of 1999. I don’t know why they […]

Not As Easy As It Looks

“In ‘reel’ life,” Jeff Merron noted in an ESPN critique of Bull Durham’s depiction of how baseball actually works, “[Nuke] LaLoosh is promoted from A ball to the majors in the span of a few months.” But in reality, “It’s almost unheard of — especially for a pitcher who struggled part of the season in […]

Even The Losers

If you played for the Worst Teams Money Could Buy, plural, then chances are you ended your evenings on the short end of a lot of baseball scores. By that standard, the universe might owe Jeff McKnight a handful of high-fives.

Few Mets played as many games as McKnight did and lost a larger percentage of […]

Charlie Williams and Destiny Redirected

This here’s a story about Charlie Williams, a young pitcher who seemed destined for if not big, then definitely specific things. Consider what can be gleaned about C.W. from his C.V.

• Born in Flushing fourteen years before ground was broken on the stadium that would make that Queens village world-famous.

• Matriculated at Great Neck South […]

Mr. Selfless

Ernie Banks on a 1969 baseball card shot at Shea Stadium. No way it wasn’t a beautiful day.

We know what Ernie Banks, Mr. Cub, had to say about doubleheaders. Yet I thought it might be fitting to remember there was more to the man who passed away Friday eight days shy of his 84th […]

The Scattered Goodbyes of 2014

“It’s pretty hard to say goodbye to anything.”
—Terry Collins, September 26

On September 28, we were prepared to say goodbye to the 2014 baseball season and one of its featured players. If the Mets were listed like a movie cast, Bobby Abreu would have been presented last, with a generous “AND” preceding his credit. He was […]

Farewell to the Father of Baseball Cards

Sad news out of Long Island: Sy Berger, the father of modern baseball cards, died today at 91.

Berger didn’t invent baseball cards — they date back to 19th-century “trade cards” and were first popularized by cigarette companies. But Berger made them the empire they became. In 1947 he started working as a marketer at Brooklyn-based Topps, […]

Ray Sadecki Did What It Took

As a seven-year-old Mets fan in my first full season of rooting, I gravitated to Ray Sadecki, who passed away Monday at the age of 73, as my favorite Met pitcher who wasn’t Tom Seaver. Seaver ascended to a permanent pedestal on a level all his own in 1969, so in the vast space between […]

The Glory That Was Rome

“Let’s see, this team lost 99 games last year, 96 the year before and 98 the year before that, right? This is a much greater challenge than the one I faced in Baltimore in 1965.”
—Frank Cashen, introduced as New York Mets general manager, 2/21/1980

Rome wasn’t built in a day. It was built in just under […]

Mr. Late Night West Coast Start

Unless the San Diego Padres were in your direct line of sight, you tended to not talk about Tony Gwynn when it came to the great players in the game in his era. He overlapped Schmidt and Murphy during the first segment of his two decades, Bonds and Griffey as he wound down. He wasn’t […]