The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com.

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

Farewell to the Father of Baseball Cards

Sad news out of Long Island: Sy Berger, the father of modern baseball cards, died today at 91.

Berger didn’t invent baseball cards — they date back to 19th-century “trade cards” and were first popularized by cigarette companies. But Berger made them the empire they became. In 1947 he started working as a marketer at Brooklyn-based Topps, […]

Ray Sadecki Did What It Took

As a seven-year-old Mets fan in my first full season of rooting, I gravitated to Ray Sadecki, who passed away Monday at the age of 73, as my favorite Met pitcher who wasn’t Tom Seaver. Seaver ascended to a permanent pedestal on a level all his own in 1969, so in the vast […]

The Glory That Was Rome

“Let’s see, this team lost 99 games last year, 96 the year before and 98 the year before that, right? This is a much greater challenge than the one I faced in Baltimore in 1965.”
—Frank Cashen, introduced as New York Mets general manager, 2/21/1980

Rome wasn’t built in a day. It was built in just under […]

Mr. Late Night West Coast Start

Unless the San Diego Padres were in your direct line of sight, you tended to not talk about Tony Gwynn when it came to the great players in the game in his era. He overlapped Schmidt and Murphy during the first segment of his two decades, Bonds and Griffey as he wound down. He wasn’t […]

Feet on the Ground

On Sunday afternoon, the San Diego Padres fell from the No. 1 slot they earned Saturday to No. 2, while the New York Mets rose from No. 2 all the way to No. 1…at least if you considered the conclusion of their three-game series not so much a baseball game, but a definitive determination of […]

Another Zimmer Night at Wrigley Field

Beautiful Wrigley Field isn’t quite so beautiful when it is lit by electric as opposed to natural means. Ever since the Mets had their lights turned out on August 9, 1988, losing to the Cubs in what became Wrigley’s first official night game (following a rainout the ballyhooed night before), it seems mostly bad befalls […]

Echoes of Murray

Social work professionals would probably refer to Murray Hysen as a support system. My friend Jeff simply called him “Dad”. He was the dad who took Jeff to his first Mets game at the age of eight, the dad who sent Jeff to Mets fantasy camp as a fiftieth birthday present. Murray passed away last […]

Promises, Promises

There are no guarantees in baseball (just as there are no “slam dunks” or “no-brainers”), but I guess you can make a promise. Sick kids have been known to return to good health on promises of home runs hit in their name — not just in the movies and Felix Unger-produced radio serials, either — […]

Ralph Kiner, Original and Forever

Y’know, I had just been thinking about Ralph Kiner. This was before the Super Bowl, when I read Edwin Pope of the Miami Herald wouldn’t be covering the game at MetLife Stadium. Pope, you see, had never missed a Super Bowl. The Super Bowl is still young enough so there are people who can said […]

Bill Mazer Took My Call

You can read a thorough appraisal of the late Bill Mazer’s life here. You can read the man himself reflect on a career that he wouldn’t have argued over if you called it Amazin’ here. And if you grew up a sports fan in the New York Metropolitan Area between the 1960s and the 1990s, […]