The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com. (Sorry, but we have no interest in ads, sponsored content or guest posts.)

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

That Rare Inner Smile

“The Mets — ah, the Mets! Superlatives do not quite fit them, but now, just as in 1969, the name alone is enough to bring back that rare inner smile that so many of us wore as summer ended.”

Summer, in a sense, has ended with the news that Roger Angell, who wrote the above sentence […]

My Gateway Met

Baseball said goodbye this week to 83-year-old Tommy Davis, the two-time National League batting champ, the RBI king whose 153 in 1962 were the most in the NL in 25 years and would be the most in the NL for another 36 years, and the first American League hitter to make the most out of […]

Left’s Go Mets

Armwise, I’m a righty who hails from a family of natural-born lefties. Sis is sinister by nature. So was Mom. Dad trended to the left side as a youngster, but this horrified his grandmother and he was converted to righthandedness before he was old enough to effectively protest. He lived 87½ years with the illegible […]

Audience of One Another

I’ve been thinking about one of my best friends from college lately. I do every year as February becomes March. I think of him intermittently regardless of month, but especially around now because now is his birthday. Mike Manning was born on March 13.

I became aware of this fact sometime prior to Spring Break 1983. […]

February Makes Us Shiver

This is a nominally festive occasion. Faith and Fear in Flushing turns 17 today. The team we cover recognized this milestone by announcing they will retire No. 17 this season and reinstate Old Timers Day so the authors of this blog will feel right at home.

All that the Mets and their MLB franchise brethren need […]

Innis, Clines & Life

If you’ve ever met me outside Citi Field to go to a game, I’ve probably added a minute or two to our entrance because I always insist on detouring to check on my brick, the one that reads:

OUR FIRST DATE
METS 8 GIANTS 3
MAY 15, 1987

The brick commemorates the first time my future wife and I […]

Met Coach Grill

Meat Loaf’s baserunner protagonist in the middle of “Paradise By The Dashboard Light,” this kid who really makes things happen out there, was probably helped along by his third base coach. Maybe not as he was rounding first and trying for second, because it’s on the runner to pick up the center fielder bobbling the […]

He Wore His Heart on His Head

The Mets turn 60 this year. They’re as old as the American League was when the Mets were first signing players in 1961, including their very first, a young feller named Bruce Fitzpatrick (Casey called him Fitzgerald) who not long ago told his story of being the original Met prospect. Bruce never made it to […]

The Seasons are Passing One by One

Because The Tonight Show was taped in beautiful downtown Burbank, it didn’t seem odd that one summer night in 1979, Johnny Carson would include Tommy Lasorda while doing his Carnac the Magnificent bit. Playing to the Southern California studio audience was one of Johnny’s staples, and Chavez Ravine was certainly within driving distance. Carnac listed […]

Let’s Just Be Glad for the Time Together

Avery the Cat, not acting as if he’s doing the author any favors.

Avery the Cat, who said goodbye to Stephanie and me on Saturday night after more than 16 years of lighting up a room in ways Fred Wilpon and Art Howe could only imagine, hung in there long enough to learn the […]