The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com. (Sorry, but we have no interest in ads, sponsored content or guest posts.)

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

Javy Day

The Mets went out at the trade deadline and did something about the hole they considered perilous in their middle infield, acquiring somebody with both a stellar defensive background and a world championship pedigree, a player with a fairly unique offensive profile. He has only a couple of months left on his existing contract, so […]

Big Score Hunting

Bill James recently tweeted, “Things happen in baseball every day of the season which haven’t happened before. It isn’t ‘History’ unless someone writing a history of baseball or a history of the franchise or some such would bother to mention it. Otherwise, it’s just an oddity, or trivia.” In that case, I’m here to mention […]

Seventh Time’s a Seventh Charm?

One half of a season is behind the New York Mets and so is the rest of the National League East. You can’t ask for a much better situation following 81 games. The chips don’t settle that way very often.

The Mets have finished the statistical first half in first place six times previously. They’ve won […]

Born to Be Not This Bad

Elton John’s “Levon” was “born a pauper to a pawn on a Christmas Day when the New York Times said, ‘God is dead, and the war’s begun.’” What exactly does that mean? As Jimmy Rabbitte said in The Commitments regarding the lyrics to “A Whiter Shade of Pale” in the imaginary interview he conducted throughout […]

The Silent Generation

The word that keeps getting repeated by Mets and people around the Mets is “electric”. Citi Field, they say, is electric. They’re not referring to how the stadium lights are lit or how its loudspeakers are amplified. They’re describing the atmosphere with fans filling seats with their anatomies and the air with their exclamations. Capacity […]

Long Ago Tomorrow

With so many roster transactions involving current Mets — including three more planned tonight to facilitate the deinjuring of a trio of heretofore injured Mets — we can be forgiven for not having taken note of every up and down involving former Mets. Yet we can’t let this AL Central subtraction from April 28 get […]

As Bob Murphy Might’ve Called It

It isn’t a beautiful night at normally beautiful Wrigley Field, as the Mets have fallen further behind the Chicago Cubs, and now manager Luis Rojas comes out of the dugout to have a word with home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman, apparently ready to make a change to his lineup. After conferring with Dreckman, Luis walks […]

Herbie Harbinger’s Home Run Hindsight

What do we want out of Opening Day?

1) For it to arrive.
2) For the Mets to win.
3) For the Mets to homer.

The first is essential, whether we’re talking wishing for the season to start sooner than possible (when Spring Training inevitably drags) or start at all (see 2020…or just the other day). The second speaks […]

Nomadland

With Spring Training having concluded Monday following a .500 result (3-3 vs. the Cardinals) and a .500 exhibition record (11-11-2), we offer a hearty Faith and Fear welcome to the all-but-official ten about-to-be new Mets of 2021, each of whom appears slated for inclusion on the Opening Day 26-man roster. Mind you, speaking conditionally is […]

The Sore, the Dead, and the Fifth

One of the rites of Spring is being reminded all in baseball is not as it sounds. For example, sometimes you hear about pitchers going through “dead arm,” and your instinct is to freak out because dead surely sounds like an irreversible condition. But then you’re told, no, “dead arm” is a temporary malady, don’t […]