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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Ouch in December

Aren’t we supposed to be immune to developing brand new sympathy pains for injured Mets players in December? Mets players aren’t supposed to get injured this time of year unless it’s something like what happened to Tug McGraw in the winter following the Miracle Mets’ world championship of 1969. In his 1974 memoir Screwball, Tug […]

The Best Kind of Debate

After a brief flurry of optimism or at least acceptance, garbage time is officially back. Before the season, a late August Mets-Angels tilt looked like one to circle on the calendar. Who wouldn’t exult in the prospect of watching Pete Alonso and Kodai Senga go up against Shohei Ohtani and Mike Trout on two playoff-bound […]

I Could Say I'd Been to Shea

On July 11, 2023, the National League defeated the American League in an All-Star Game for the first time since 2012, which added a flourish to the 50th Anniversary celebration of this correspondent’s first game at Shea Stadium, which occurred on July 11, 1973. To commemorate the seminal occasion, I dug into the Faith and […]

A Three-Run What?

The important thing: The Mets actually won.

The less important thing: The Mets barely won a thoroughly strange, confounding game against the Nationals, one that left you without much confidence that any kind of worm has turned in any direction one would want a worm to turn. (If you’ve ever wondered, that strange turn [ahem] of […]

Prostrate and Semi-Triumphant

Jeff McNeil lay face down in the Arizona turf, the last out of a 6-5 Mets win safely in his glove. He wasn’t hurt; he just needed a minute.

At that point, we all did.

The Mets moved to 11-4 on the season, which I will use bleeding-edge analytics to categorize as pretty damn good. But it […]

Left’s Go Mets

Armwise, I’m a righty who hails from a family of natural-born lefties. Sis is sinister by nature. So was Mom. Dad trended to the left side as a youngster, but this horrified his grandmother and he was converted to righthandedness before he was old enough to effectively protest. He lived 87½ years with the illegible […]

A Trade Beyond Belief

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Keep on searching now
Got to look up
Don’t look down
Keep the faith
—Little Richard

As baseball’s Winter Meetings approached in 1974, the Mets’ new general manager, Joe McDonald, drew some attention when he told […]

The Great White Whale of Arizona

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Hark ye yet again—the little lower layer. All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event—in the living act, the undoubted deed—there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth […]

What's in a Number?

Our co-newest Met is wearing a familiar number.

Flamethrower Edwin Diaz, whom I already appreciated for being really good before discovering his nickname is “Sugar,” will wear 39. That’s no particularly big thing in the annals of Met lore: the first 39 that pops into my head is Gary Gentry, the blueprint for all too many […]

The Company Jake Keeps

The new Metropolitan standard of excellence by way of archaic statistics is Five Wins and Six Losses. That’s right, 5-6. Never mind the likes of 25-7, 19-10, 22-9, 24-4 or 20-6. Move over, Messrs. Seaver (those first three), Gooden and Dickey. You were Amazin’ in your respective […]