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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Hammerin’ Mets

By some stroke of coincidence, the Mets have visited Atlanta on the 30th, 40th and 50th anniversaries of Hank Aaron’s 715th career home run, which is swell, because what decent baseball fan doesn’t adore and revere the legacy of Hank Aaron? The Mets have to play the Braves at some point of every season. Might […]

Midnight at the Oasis

A late night West Coast game is a late night West Coast game under any guise, whether the coast is relatively ballpark-adjacent or an entire state over. Arizona’s oceanic only in that it chooses to not spring its clocks forward for Daylight Saving Time, meaning that for all intents and purposes from a New Yorker’s […]

In Which the Kids Go on a Big Adventure With Their Polar Bear Pal

For most of Wednesday night, my only thought was that feeling pain because of the Mets was actually progress: better writhing in agony than sitting dour and numb watching another night of bad baseball, as we have for the last three and a half weeks.

Kodai Senga was the best he’s looked as a Met, with […]

Doin’ Met Things

When the Mets win, it’s best that the Mets win by doin’ Met things. When the Mets win, perhaps it’s not important to give the win a litmus test and just accept the W, but it’s more comforting to sense the Mets are functioning as they are supposed to so a given win doesn’t come […]

The Damnedest of Things

Most of the time you don’t know. Sometimes you know just enough. Sunday I didn’t definitively know if the Mets were dead and buried at 4-0 after one; were alive and well at 4-4 in the middle of the fourth; had dirt kicked on them at 7-4 at the end of four; had sprung back […]

Plum Assignment

“Kid, we’re short of staff this weekend. I need you to go out to Citi Field and cover Sunday night’s Mets-Phillies game. The main thing is the lede. Watch what happens, and when you think you know what the main story is, type up a graf and shoot it back to the copy desk. We […]

Not So, New York

To paraphrase the late, great Roger Angell (for neither the first nor last time in this space), specifically what he said about his presence in Boston during Game Six of the 1986 NLCS while the Mets were cheating death in Houston and baseball had “burst its seams and was wild in the streets” in New […]

Bottle That Stuff

Well, well, well.

That wasn’t what I thought for most of Thursday night’s game against the Phillies, but then that’s always the case with a classic comeback — you need to trudge through the vale of despond before getting sherpa’ed up Mount Probability to giddily plant the most unexpected of flags.

That mountaineering metaphor’s less random than […]

A Banquet and Then a Food Fight

Pitchers’ duels are one of the earliest tests of budding baseball fandom — dull to the casual observer who wants action and doesn’t get why those around him are oohing and aahing over hitters swinging and missing or just looking flustered at balls zipping from hurlers’ hands to places they weren’t expected to wind up. […]

Get It Right the Next Time (That’s the Main Thing)

Earl Weaver’s oft-cited quote that “this ain’t a football game, we do this every day” came in handy after Saturday night’s debacle — up 6-0 in the 8th, only to lose 9-7 in the 9th — that indicated we should never do this again. The Earl of Baltimore’s observation is equal parts…

instructive — 161 baseball […]