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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Agents of Chaos

There are games you’re clearly fated to win, ones you’re pretty much guaranteed to lose, and ones where the outcome teeters and totters between joy and horror while your heart tries to keep pace. And then there are games like Monday night’s in Cincinnati — ones where the sheer insanity of everything gobbles up logic […]

Get It Right the Next Time (That’s the Main Thing)

Earl Weaver’s oft-cited quote that “this ain’t a football game, we do this every day” came in handy after Saturday night’s debacle — up 6-0 in the 8th, only to lose 9-7 in the 9th — that indicated we should never do this again. The Earl of Baltimore’s observation is equal parts…

instructive — 161 baseball […]

A Day of Halves

You know what? I’ve come around on the idea of the Mets playing the Pirates again right after the All-Star Break.

Not because I think the Pirates are a bunch of tomato cans — that’s a dangerous thing to think about any opponent, and if the Bucs win Sunday they’ll have split the series — but […]

Seventh Time’s a Seventh Charm?

One half of a season is behind the New York Mets and so is the rest of the National League East. You can’t ask for a much better situation following 81 games. The chips don’t settle that way very often.

The Mets have finished the statistical first half in first place six times previously. They’ve won […]

June Gloom

A review of some emotions we were feeling not so long ago: amazement at the tenacity and resourcefulness of the Mets’ “bench mob,” pinch-me gratitude that the team was in first place, and perhaps even a little optimism that the starting rotation’s continued excellence would see it through such ancillary difficulties.

The Mets are still in […]

The Other Guys Are Trying to Win, Too

To be fair, it’s only natural: As fans, we see everything through a certain-colored lens, in our case one split between blue and orange.

So let’s peer through it and see what’s what: Marcus Stroman was throttling the Diamondbacks, the Mets had the lead, and then everything went south. A minor but chippy on-field dustup between […]

The Perils of Young Pitchers

One of my more searing minor Mets memories — to use a very Mets-fan turn of phrase — is from May 3, 1996.

That was Paul Wilson‘s sixth career start, against the Cubs at Wrigley Field. Wilson, one-third of the vaunted Generation K, hadn’t exactly streaked out of the gate: As the second month of his […]

Mistrust Never Sleeps

Tuesday night’s Mets triumph in Philadelphia may have been the least convincing 8-4 victory in the history of 8-4 victories, but the key words here are “triumph” and “victory,” both of which the Mets achieved. The win column greets them with no hesitation.

Fortunately, the Style Council is not authorized to award points within the National […]

That Familiar Feeling

Well, those were some complicated feelings to open with.

Your capsule summary: Jacob deGrom was terrific, the Mets’ offense looked like the kind of patient, relentless machine that will chew opponents up, and the team even played some solid defense. Well, until the offense whiffed on multiple knockout blows, deGrom departed having thrown just 77 pitches, […]

So Far Away

This time his observations were outrunning his understanding. This vague America he was now reporting was swelling with strange, vague forms which his thinking could no longer shape into clean stories. No piling up of more reportorial facts, no teasing anecdote, no embracing concept, could hide from him what was wrong: his old ideas no […]