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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Not So Heavy Next Time

The studio has a few notes on the next installment of MY FAVORITE SEASONS, FROM LEAST FAVORITE TO MOST FAVORITE, 1969-PRESENT.

***19. 1998
First off, we love the concept. The Mets as a team you go into the season having expectations for is fresh. I mean, it’s not like it hasn’t been done before, but it will […]

In the Middling Years

We have reached the third installment of MY FAVORITE SEASONS, FROM LEAST FAVORITE TO MOST FAVORITE, 1969-PRESENT. I can’t swear it’s the middle installment, but below you’ll find the middle portion of the list: the seasons just before the median (Nos. 33-29); the median season (No. 28); and the seasons just beyond the median (Nos. […]

The Best Kind of Debate

After a brief flurry of optimism or at least acceptance, garbage time is officially back. Before the season, a late August Mets-Angels tilt looked like one to circle on the calendar. Who wouldn’t exult in the prospect of watching Pete Alonso and Kodai Senga go up against Shohei Ohtani and Mike Trout on two playoff-bound […]

Meet The Deans

I got a huge kick out of leafing through the 1967 Mets Yearbook years after it was published and finding that even then Ed Kranepool, a mere 24 yet the only Met left from the Mets’ first year of 1962, was referred to as “The Dean” of the Mets in terms of continuous service with […]

The Age of Piazza & Wright

Welcome to the final chapter of Faith and Fear’s historical countdown of the The Top 100 Mets of the 2000s. A full introduction to what we’ve been doing is available here. These are the more or less best Mets we rooted for as Mets fans during the decade FAFIF came to be. In honor of […]

This One Has a Chance

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

True confessions time: When the rumor surfaced in the spring of 1998 that the Mets were about to acquire Mike Piazza, I was against the idea. Vehemently against it, in fact. The Mets, I […]

Nine Wonderful Days in the Life of Todd Alan Pratt, Backup Catcher

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Being a catcher is a tough gig. The hours of squatting are bad enough, before considering foul tips, overenthusiastic backswings, and collisions at the plate. But being a backup catcher? That’s even tougher. Now […]

A Baseball First Husband

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Some political raconteur (no one agrees exactly who) tattooed George H.W. Bush with the line that he reminded every woman of her first husband. It’s a good line — a put-down, but one delivered […]

Wanna Have a Catcher?

Remember that bruise on Kevin Plawecki’s mitt hand from Wednesday night’s game, the one that was declared just a bruise once x-rays were reported as negative? You will when you look for Plawecki behind the plate and see no trace of him. The hand, we learned from the Post’s Mike Puma Friday morning, is broken from […]

Most Valuable Seaver

Happy Tom Seaver’s Birthday! No. 41 is 73 today. He’s also No. 1 forever, not only in all the ways we usually think, but in a very specific, sort of timely way.

Tom Seaver was the first National League East Most Valuable Player.

The what?

OK, so it’s a mythical award, but it’s based in reality and, besides, […]