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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Born Under a K Sign

Max Scherzer pitched seven innings of shutout ball on his 38th birthday. Of course he did. He was born to put up zeroes on the night of July 27 in the borough of Queens before a sold-out house in attendance to cheer on a first-place team. It was foretold when he first drew breath and […]

A Foxhole Player

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Looks back at the ’86 Mets often pair Wally Backman with Lenny Dykstra, his fellow partner in grime (and co-star in the ’86 year-in-review video’s super-cringey “Wild Boys” montage). Which makes sense: Backman and […]

Nails and the Chalkboard

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

When I was a teenager, a lot of people assumed I’d be a sportswriter. Which made a lot of sense: I loved baseball and writing, so why not put the two together? But I […]

I've Seen the Future and It Doesn't Work

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

As August 1988 came to an end, the New York Mets were one full season removed from a championship and looked like a good bet to add more flags over Shea Stadium. The team’s […]

Best Six Ever?

Ol’ No. 48 had been there before, so he knew how it goes. He’d pitch well, his team wouldn’t score for him and they’d go on to lose. Jacob deGrom practices the whole season ’round for All-Star Games. He seemed happy to have been there nonetheless.

Ol’ No. 20 was no longer new to the spotlight, […]

Department of the Interior

We now interrupt the Mets’ first pennant race in seven years to race all the way around the bases for the first time in five years. We won’t pause to do so, however, for this is one of those plays in which you can’t hit pause. You hit and you run, or as Tom Hanks […]

Dunham Bull?

What constitutes a trend? For our purposes, let’s say it’s when two people you know relay to you, independent of one another, the same piece of information accompanied by a similar slice of curiosity.

In her upcoming memoir, Not That Kind Of Girl, the reliably trendy Lena Dunham says her gynecologist used to pitch for the […]

All Hail Relative Normalcy

The best thing about tonight’s 4-3 victory over the Marlins? It was a relatively normal baseball game.

It wasn’t Monday night’s six-error shitshow in which the Marlins won by sucking less. Nor was it Tuesday night’s ludicrous display of non-pitching, with Jon Niese pitching as badly as he could without actually losing and old non-friend Brad […]

Eight Points About Playing the Nats

1. When the Mets seem to have the game won but the Nats keep hanging around in the rearview mirror, you’re not being paranoid. They really are closer than they appear.

2. Particularly if it’s happening at Nationals Park.

3. I guess it’s nice that David Wright and Ryan Zimmerman are buds and all, but I hate […]

Not Everybody Was A Star

Congratulations to proven Amazin’ research maven Mathias Kook and talented Metsian writer William Akers for understanding the 1986 World Series was a Fall Classic Sly Stone probably adored, for almost Everybody [Was] A Star. As noted here, 26 of the 43 players who played in the last truly great World Series — parochially speaking — […]