The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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What Have We Here?

Our club’s in jeopardy of disappearing from the divisional race they led for months on end, so perhaps the appropriate way to sum them up is through a smidgen of Jeopardy.

THEY WERE NEVER
REALLY THAT GREAT,
BUT NEITHER CAN
THEY POSSIBLY BE
QUITE THIS BAD

Who are the 2021 New York Mets?

Correct. Uncertainty has the board.

The Mets of the moment […]

Love in the City at Century’s End

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Not every man’s a talker, John.
—Howard Da Silva as Benjamin Franklin to William Daniels as John Adams, 1776

On August 13, 1997, Comedy Central debuted a new animated series called South Park. […]

All 89 Mets Postseason Games Ranked

They were 89 moments in the sun, 89 moments under the spotlight, 89 days and nights of our lives when little else mattered to us. I mean more than usual.

“The Mets go melodramatic in October,” Roger Angell once wrote. “It’s in their genes.” Here we inspect the DNA and report the findings. Here we do […]

Nine Wonderful Days in the Life of Todd Alan Pratt, Backup Catcher

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

Being a catcher is a tough gig. The hours of squatting are bad enough, before considering foul tips, overenthusiastic backswings, and collisions at the plate. But being a backup catcher? That’s even tougher. Now […]

Mora in America: Melvinnium Approaches

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

I am determined to take our best traditions into the future. But with all respect, we do not need to build a bridge to the past. We need to build a […]

Our Team If Not Our Time

To deploy a dated reference, baseball seasons may unfold in the sports pages, yet we do not experience them oblivious to what’s transpiring in the rest of the paper. No retelling of the 1969 Mets — and we’ve had a few this year — feels complete if […]

Win 82 for Zack

Zack Wheeler, in his fifth major league season of actually pitching as opposed to healing, has never pitched for a Mets team that finished with a winning record. The only two good seasons during his injury-interrupted tenure were the seasons he missed with Tommy John surgery and […]

The Grudge Report

Todd Frazier is officially a Met! Which means Mike Moustakas isn’t! News like this demands exclamation points late in an ellipsis kind of winter.

Yet I am delighted enough to punctuate with enthusiasm, not so much because Frazier is a name-brand free agent who’s signed for only two years (I generally fall for those, regardless of […]

Ready Already

Earl Weaver, were he still among us, would likely be impatiently reaching inside his custom-made jersey for another cigarette, and not because his successor in Baltimore held out his best reliever in Toronto while the Orioles’ season went up in smoke. Weaver, between puffs of his filthy nicotine habit (having to stressfully rely on Don […]

A Little Bit of Hamilton in My Life

It was the “Mambo No. 5” game. That’s one of the two ways I differentiate it from all the other games I’ve attended. In the seventh-inning stretch, they played “Mambo No. 5,” the very contemporary and very kitschy song Lou Bega was making famous late in the summer of 1999. I don’t know why they […]