The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com. (Sorry, but we have no interest in ads, sponsored content or guest posts.)

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

Barely Above the Minimum

Late in Sunday’s season finale at Atlanta, Gary Cohen mentioned Braves pitchers had faced two over the minimum. When the 162nd game of 2021 concluded, that count had held. There’d been 29 Mets up and, with the assistance of a couple of double plays, 27 Mets down.

Barely above the minimum similarly described the year of […]

One Last Caress, It’s Time to Dress for Fall

Four days earlier, I came home from a stadium sunburned. That’s how recently it felt like summer, even if it was technically already autumn on the calendar, even if for an afternoon I had moved on as many American sports fans do post-summer, to the NFL. The sun singed me in Section 144 at MetLife, […]

Disposable Seasonette

But after all, it’s what we’ve done
That makes us what we are
—Jim Croce

On one hand, the Mets were defeated in embarrassing fashion on Sunday, losing to the Nationals, 15-5, leaving them at their low-water mark for 2020, eight games below .500 and tied for the worst record in the National League East.

On the other hand, […]

Just Another Game at Home

We want people to be able to watch sports, to the extent that people are still staying home. It gives people something to do. It’s a return to normalcy.
—Gov. Andrew Cuomo, May 24, 2020

On Sunday afternoon, August 7, 1994, the Mets lost to the Marlins, 2-0, at Shea Stadium. Had I known the outcome in […]

The Shot Heard Through the Spring

Welcome to A Met for All Seasons, a series in which we consider a given Met who played in a given season and…well, we’ll see.

The New York Mets will, in all likelihood, play baseball again on Friday.

I say “in all likelihood” because it might rain.

But I also say it, of course, because there’s a pandemic going on, one […]

A Connoisseur’s Guide to Closing Day

’Cause it all begins again when it ends.
—Roxette, “Joyride”

My December festival of retrospective introspection (or introspective retrospection) feels like it’s reached a logical endpoint here on the last day of the month, the last day of the year, and have I mentioned it’s the last day of the decade? Also, it’s my birthday — happy […]

The Visceral

Someone to hold you too close
Someone to hurt you too deep
Someone to sit in your chair
To ruin your sleep
To make you aware
Of being alive

It was visceral in a way not much of Mets baseball is for me after 50 years of rooting for the Mets and 15 years of writing of the Mets. I think […]

Relentlessly It Ends

The baseball season ended Sunday, you might have noticed. Maybe you didn’t if you’re one of those people who insists you stopped watching the Mets by June, a good month to have looked away, I suppose. I never stopped looking, never stopped noticing, never stopped doing all […]

Going to the End of the Line

If you’ve never read the work of James Schapiro, author of the blog Shea Bridge Report (“good writing about a bad team”), then Faith and Fear invites you to pull up a chair and dig in. James kindly offered to file some impressions from the final Mets game in Philadelphia, and we wisely took him […]

There Was A Season

A time to be born, a time to die
A time to plant, a time to reap
A time to kill, a time to heal
A time to laugh, a time to weep

Baseball gives you what came before, what’s going on and what will come next. Life does that, too, I suppose, but as Casey Stengel might have […]