The blog for Mets fans
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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Try These On For Size

Thanks for coming along. I know you hate when I drag you shopping, especially when there’s been so much riveting local sports on TV, but with all I needed to pick up for my Saturday night paragraph, I needed somebody’s opinion on how it all goes together.

I’m gonna try all these facts on for size. […]

The One That Didn’t Get Away

In most parallel universes, the Mets lost Thursday night. They had to.

They were playing the Marlins.

Giancarlo Stanton went traditionally deep.

They were playing the Marlins.

Martin Prado added his own four cents.

They were playing the Marlins.

Dillon Gee pitched gamefully but not quite well enough to fully extricate himself from his last tangle of trouble.

They were playing the […]

Embracing That Which Annoys

In case you don’t remember, baseball is back. A week ago at this time, you could barely sit still in anticipation of its annual arrival. Now it’s part of the woodwork.

I like the woodwork this way. I like baseball this way. I like when it keeps us company this way, embedded so smoothly into the […]

A Mental Game

Baseball’s a mental game. Perhaps you’ve heard.

For a maddening, frustrating game this one was actually kind of fun. Wait, hear me out on that.

The Mets lost because multiple members of the team made physical errors, followed by multiple members of the team making mental errors. Those weren’t the fun parts.

But these parts were pretty neat:

back-to-back home […]

Anybody (Else) Love Wilmer?

Some players you take an instant liking to. I took an instant liking to Wilmer Flores when he first came up two Augusts ago. He’s likable. He’s rootable. I’m rooting for him to succeed if indeed he is the Mets’ starting shortstop in the year ahead. I rooted for morning-line starting second baseman Brad Emaus […]

Nobody Goes There Anymore (But I Do)

When they opened it in 2009, the Mets of Fred and Jeff Wilpon dedicated themselves to convincing potential patrons that Citi Field would present a premium ballpark experience because it would grant those with the right kind of ticket access to exclusive clubs. That first year, very specific castes were established in terms of who […]

Played Under a Bad Sign

Pictured: One of the many innings when Anthony Rendon batted.

There were two hints on my ticket for Saturday night’s game that a pleasant result wasn’t in the offing:

1) The Washington Nationals were listed as the opponent.

2) Chris Young’s picture adorned it.

The Nationals need no introduction in our neighborhood. One delightfully foot-stompin’ win notwithstanding, Flushing […]

Loyalty Rewarded ... for One Night

It was probably the eighth inning when I realized I’d been watching the entire game between the Mets and the Rockies yet wasn’t sure I could name a Rockie who was on the field. I taxed my brain and managed to come up with Michael Cuddyer, but that was because he’d hit a home run. Beyond […]

How Dilson Herrera Is Like 18th Century Connecticut

So I’ve been reading this great book by Scott Weidensaul called The First Frontier, about the wars between the early colonists and the Indians. And a stray passage in it reminded me of something I’d forgotten: Connecticut’s 1662 charter claimed its western boundary was the “South Sea,” AKA the Pacific Ocean. This strikes us as […]

Another Hard Landing

There were nearly as few available Mets as there were visible Mets fans at Citi Field Wednesday night. The “25-man roster” was as hyperbolic a calculation as “paid attendance of 22,014”. Terry Collins fielded a Quadruple-A lineup, relied on a three-man bench and came up a run short of victory.

On the plus side, boy was […]