The blog for Mets fans
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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Double Vision

Seeing baseball in person always reminds me that the game is really two different experiences. The view from your couch lets you play HD voyeur, seeing everything from the pitcher’s grip to how the catcher frames each pitch — and with stats and expert analysis handed to you, like a surgeon taking tools from an […]

The Cobb County Blues

Give this much to the Mets during their current run of troubles: They’re finding new ways to lose.

But then that’s appropriate for the ballpark they were trapped in Thursday night: White Flight Stadium (or whatever the Braves are calling their shameful taxpayer-extorted shrine to suburbia these days) may not quite be the house of horrors […]

The Right Amount of Tension

The Mets finally got to play baseball Friday afternoon, and while no one can say what the next week or even the next day will bring, getting to play baseball was a much-needed respite and relief.

It was also a pretty damn good baseball game, one with exactly the right amount of tension — some thrills […]

Pitching & 118.3-MPH Homers

Steven Matz went deep. Amed Rosario went deeper. Pete Alonso went deepest of all. Edwin Diaz made certain we didn’t plumb the depths.

And that is how the New York Mets took sole possession of first place twelve games into the 2019 season, which clinches the Mets absolutely nothing. […]

That Kind of Day

Remember when the Mets were good?

Our once-promising team is now thoroughly rooted in all-time last place, behind such worthies as the 2018 Baltimore Orioles, the 1962 Mets, the 1875 Brooklyn Atlantics and the 1899 Cleveland Spiders. That seemingly pretty decent 17-12 record? An illusion born of sabermetrics or some other newfangled defacement of the grand […]

A Strange One in Smyrna

Win or lose, the 2017 Mets are exhausting.

They didn’t win tonight — Matt Harvey‘s poor location, lousy relief, Freddie Freeman‘s ubiquitous bat and annoyingly good baseball played by Ender Inciarte, Brandon Phillips and Nick Markakis took care of that — but they made it interesting, with Jay Bruce‘s grand slam making it 9-7. Dare I […]

Eyes on the Prize

Sometimes your ace, while perfectly worthy of New Yorker covers, is missing that little wrinkle from his fastball and can’t locate it anyway and he gets whacked around.

Sometimes an opponent who’s spent the year being an absolute tomato can manages to bewilder.

Sometimes your hitters connect with ball after ball after ball in ways that seem promising […]

Ain't That Grand?

Curtis Granderson isn’t having fun so far.

There’s the .127 batting average, the $60 million contract, and even the defense — what, exactly, that throw in the nightmarish top of the fifth was is a question best not pondered. Granderson is by all accounts a peach of a guy, but he’s been hearing boos from […]

Two Weird Baseball Traditions

In the bottom of the ninth, with one out, the score tied and the winning run on second, I was deliriously certain that Wilmer Flores would single, making the Mets walkoff winners and getting himself mobbed at first. When Flores grounded out instead, I was not particularly disheartened: The Braves walked John Buck (not sure […]

Decline and Fall

The descent of Western Civilization from its state of earthly pre-eminence can be dated from the pagan celebrations that regularly engulfed the plates of home in the early stages of the twenty-first century Anno Domini. These were bacchanalia whose sheer offensiveness to long-established standards of morals and tastes crested with the actions of the False […]