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ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Good Company

Was Friday night’s late-night tilt against the Padres A) deeply weird; B) snoozy with a side of annoying; C) frustrating; or D) all of the above?

I’m going with D.

For a while it looked like Blake Snell would achieve one of the less impressive no-hitters in baseball history – he gave up a lot of solid […]

Thinking Can Only Hurt the Ballclub

I love J.D. Davis, from his weirdo back-construction nickname (“Jonathan Gregory Davis” doesn’t obviously suggest “J.D. Davis,” but “Jonathan Davis” plus a little repetition does) and his shrill heckling to his postgame manic episodes and general air of just being tickled to play baseball. But a thinking J.D. Davis is his own worst enemy.

I’ll paint […]

Elbow Room for Interpretation

Sure, if you slow down video of somebody sticking his protectively guarded elbow in the general direction of a baseball passing otherwise untouched through the strike zone, it’s gonna look bad.

So don’t do that.

Instead, live in the moment of Michael Conforto’s right elbow instinctively jerking ever so slightly within the flight path of Anthony […]

You Must Be Within Four Games of .500 to Ride This Ride

So in the end, after all the Sturming and Dranging, the Mets did nothing else. Noah Syndergaard stayed (and celebrated with a fairly hilarious bit of guerrilla Twitter video). Zack Wheeler stayed. Edwin Diaz stayed. Even Todd Frazier stayed. Prospects of whatever pedigree did not arrive. Cash considerations were not considered. Former college roommates of […]

So That One Was Fun

Before all the heroics — which we will revel in a couple of paragraphs down, I promise you — the Mets and Nationals played a rather odd baseball game.

Max Scherzer pitched six innings, the last of them on fumes, throwing 109 pitches and giving up no runs.

Jacob deGrom pitched six innings, the last of them […]

Various Injustices

Bryce Harper arranged his own early exit. Steven Matz decided to stay a while longer this time. And Mark Carlson … well, he didn’t know if pitches were coming or going.

For the Mets, Matz was the happy headline. A start after recording not even a solitary out against these same Phillies, he acquitted himself far […]

The Human Element

Wednesday’s matinee against the Phillies was simultaneously an excellent baseball game and one about which there doesn’t seem to be a lot to say at first glance: Zack Wheeler was good, but Jake Arrieta was a little better. Wheeler gave up solo homers to Scott Kingery and Cesar Hernandez, while Arrieta surrendered one to Michael Conforto, […]

When It Gets Late Early

A day game right after a bad loss is often a good thing — right back at em, rinse that bad taste out of our mouths, and what-not. The Mets will put that baseball truism to the test in a couple of hours, and most likely give us a reason to doubt it the way […]

Trading Places

Now you listen to me! I want trading reopened right now. Get those brokers back in here! Turn those machines back on! Turn those machines back on!

That’s Mortimer Duke at the end of 1983’s Trading Places, after he realizes Louis Winthorpe III and Billy Ray Valentine have ruined him and his brother Randolph in revenge for a […]

Make Your Own Rules

Good news for all you kids out there. You can now play baseball any way you like. The rules don’t apply. Just slam into middle infielders at will. You don’t even need to be on your way to second base. You do this, and you and your team shall be rewarded handsomely.

That’s my takeaway after […]