The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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Doctor, My Eyes

I blinked. And I blinked again. Maybe I rubbed my eyes. I don’t remember. Whatever I did, it left me seeing a trail of optical detritus. It was just what wasn’t there but briefly appeared to be. I was six, a first-grader. I had no idea how eyesight worked, just that it worked. But I […]

The Greatest Story, Ever Retold

If you set your DVR to record Seaver on Sunday or early Monday, you may think your unit was manufactured by M. Donald Grant, for neither the scheduled 4:30 PM showing on Channel 5 in New York or the 1:00 AM airing on FS1 went off hitchless. That’s the danger in saying something will run […]

Solo Artists Band Together

“At 10:13 P.M., it became officially official. The Cubs had lost, 6-2. Even if the Mets lost the second game, they would still be first. Millennium, we are here. But the Mets were no longer in a mood to lose anything.”
—Leonard Koppett, on the Mets taking first place as they swept a doubleheader from the […]

When the Mets Equaled Joy

All Mets fans who were around for 1969 enjoyed 1969 in their own way. My friend Garry Spector, who was eleven, enjoyed it so much it drove him to tears. Garry recently penned a sweet reminiscence on the always exquisite Perfect Pitch blog (the unique baseball/musical diamond tended by Metropolitan Opera oboist and Metropolitan Baseball […]

Over By Any Measure

Repeatedly as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Mets, I get slightly irked. Not by the celebration or the feat celebrated but by a tiny detail that is continually reported inaccurately. Those Mets, it keep getting said, fell ten games behind the Cubs in the National League East in mid-August before turning their […]

Jim Gosger Lives

When I first started identifying as a Mets fan, fifty years ago late this summer, you couldn’t have convinced me the Mets could do wrong. There was no evidence to support the assertion. The Mets mostly won. The rare defeat, such as that experienced by the Mets in Baltimore to open the World Series, was […]

Try, Try Again

Up they haven’t given, though up they haven’t gotten. After every Mets loss, of which there’ve been myriad, I hear the manager and selected players tell postgame questioners, “Nobody here has given up.” That’s admirable on the surface, implicit in the job description, ineffectual in the final score.

The Mets don’t give up. They come to […]

Way To Go

On Saturday afternoon, July 17, 1976, I saw Lloyd Waner hit and Tom Seaver pitch. Same place, different games. Waner appeared in the Old Timers Game at sunny Shea Stadium. At 13, I considered it a hoot that someone from the dusty pages of baseball’s distant past stood in the box and swung the bat, […]

And Counting

My first numerical obsession as a baseball fan developed in the waning days of the 1969 regular season. There was nothing waning about late September and early October if you loved the Mets, but I did catch on, at age six, to the finite nature of the schedule, so I figured out that the Mets […]

We Inevitably Pass This Way Again

The Mets lost to the Brewers at Citi Field on Saturday night, 8-6, in an ugly game made briefly attractive before it reverted to hideous. Noah Syndergaard pitched badly, Travis d’Arnaud caught badly and Jeurys Familia thought badly. In between, Pete Alonso provided a powerful antidote to the mounting blahs, but nothing anybody did well could overcome […]